News

Journalist Mark Halperin to keynote CRN annual meeting

BY Michael Johnsen

WASHINGTON — The Council for Responsible Nutrition on Tuesday announced that Mark Halperin, New York Times best-selling author and well-known senior political analyst for Time, will return as a featured speaker at The Conference, CRN’s annual symposium for the dietary supplement industry.

“We are delighted to welcome Mark Halperin back to The Conference,” stated Steve Mister, president and CEO of CRN. “Mark Halperin is this generation’s Bob Woodward, a shrewd investigative journalist with an ability to capture the most important moments in our political era. His speech at our 2010 annual conference was one of the highlights, and I know attendees will be looking forward to hearing from him again. He gave us a riveting account of the 2008 presidential election, and I, like so many others, am looking forward to getting his take on what is shaping up to be one of the most interesting political cycles in decades.”

As a featured speaker at The Conference, Halperin will share his insights on the upcoming race for the White House, the 2012 Congressional elections and how any shifts in power may affect the dietary supplement industry over the next few years. The 2008 presidential election was the focus of his popular book "Game Change." He currently is writing a follow-up book on the 2012 election and will share some of his stories from this new book with conference attendees.

The Conference takes place Oct. 3 to 6 at the Montage Laguna Beach in Laguna Beach, Calif.


Interested in this topic? Sign up for our weekly Collaborative Care e-newsletter.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon’s entry would shake up the most?
News

Researchers: Vitamin C RDA should be raised; pharmaceutical trials for vitamins faulty

BY Michael Johnsen

CORVALLIS, Ore. — Researchers argue there is compelling evidence that the recommended dietary allowance of vitamin C should be raised to 200 mg per day for adults, up from its current levels of 75 mg for women and 90 mg for men, in a recent report published in Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition.

The recommended dietary allowance of vitamin C is less than half what it should be, according to the researchers, because medical experts insist on evaluating vitamin C in the same way they do pharmaceutical drugs and reach faulty conclusions as a result.

“It’s time to bring some common sense to this issue, look at the totality of the scientific evidence and go beyond some clinical trials that are inherently flawed,” stated Balz Frei, professor and director of the Linus Pauling Institute at Oregon State University. “Significant numbers of people in the [United States] and around the world are deficient in vitamin C, and there’s growing evidence that more of this vitamin could help prevent chronic disease,” Frei said. “The way clinical researchers study micronutrients right now, with the same type of so-called ‘phase three randomized placebo-controlled trials’ used to test pharmaceutical drugs, almost ensures they will find no beneficial effect. We need to get past that.”

Unlike testing the safety or function of a prescription drug, the researchers said, such trials are ill suited to demonstrate the disease prevention capabilities of substances that already are present in the human body and required for normal metabolism. Some benefits of micronutrients in lowering chronic disease risk also show up only after many years or even decades of optimal consumption of vitamin C — a factor often not captured in shorter-term clinical studies.

A wider body of metabolic, pharmacokinetic, laboratory and demographic studies suggest just the opposite, that higher levels of vitamin C could help reduce chronic diseases, including heart disease, stroke, cancer and the underlying issues that lead to them, such as high blood pressure, chronic inflammation, poor immune response and atherosclerosis.

“We believe solid research shows the RDA should be increased,” Frei said. “And the benefit-to-risk ratio is very high. A 200 mg intake of vitamin C on a daily basis poses absolutely no risk, but there is strong evidence it would provide multiple, substantial health benefits.”


Interested in this topic? Sign up for our weekly Collaborative Care e-newsletter.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon’s entry would shake up the most?
News

Lee Stafford adds new hair care products to Ulta shelves

BY Antoinette Alexander

NEW YORK — British celebrity hair stylist Lee Stafford, who brought his line of products to the United States in May, is introducing two additions to the 19-product list at Ulta Beauty.

The Lee Stafford original dry shampoo and ArganOil from Morocco deep nourishing treatment will both be available at Ulta locations nationwide and at Ulta.com.

Lee Stafford original dry shampoo enables users to get more days out of their wash, blow dry and styling. Containing a higher quality of powder made from corn starch, not rice starch like many other dry shampoos in the market, Lee Stafford’s original dry shampoo goes in and out of hair easily to remove odors, blast oily roots and add volume back into lifeless locks. This versatile spray also can be used to add additional volume and texture to clean hair. The suggested retail price is $8.49.

Lee Stafford ArganOil from Morocco deep nourishing treatment with pro-argan complex, a new product in the United States, targets especially vulnerable areas of hair, hydrating and restoring hair to create a perfect, sleek salon finish. Argan oil is a nourishing oil, native to Morocco, that contains many ingredients associated with repairing hair to a healthy state. In addition to the ArganOil from Morocco shampoo and conditioner, this deep treatment can be used in between a regular wash and condition. Once hair condition improves from daily use of ArganOil from Morocco deep nourishing treatment, it can be used once a week to maintain healthy hair. The suggested retail price is $14.99.

The newest Lee Stafford additions to hit shelves at Ulta will join the line, referred to as The Pink Range. Stafford originally developed The Pink Range to satisfy his need for a cohesive line that could produce desired results on his own clients. He uses each of the products in his own salon as his stamp of approval, and strives to bring his specialty salon care into women’s at-home routines.

The National Hairdressers Federation named Stafford as the U.K.’s Most Influential Hairdresser of 2010. With a roster of numerous celebrities, including The Rolling Stones, Avril Lavigne, Dido and many more, Stafford is well known across the United Kingdom as a stylist, product creator, editorial spokesman and hair care educator.

 

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon’s entry would shake up the most?