HEALTH

Jimmy Johnson to be featured in new ExtenZe commercials

BY Michael Johnsen

ENCINO, Calif. The InterMedia Group of Cos. on Wednesday announced that ExtenZe spokesman Jimmy Johnson, Fox NFL Sunday host and newest "Survivor" castaway, will participate in a new round of commercials that will relate stories of what some of his colleagues in sports and the broadcast booth have said to him since he joined up with ExtenZe.

 

And to top off the 30-minute spot, Johnson’s wife Rhonda Johnson makes an appearance with her own brand of repartee.

 

 

"Jimmy Johnson’s affable approach to endorsing this sensitive personal product has really given the ExtenZe campaign tremendous momentum in all media and communication channels, taking on a life of its own," stated Robert Yallen, CEO of the InterMedia Group of Cos. "Product awareness and sales have soared, and the credibility he brings to the table is undeniable. In this next series of ads, we’re simply capitalizing on the buzz and showing that ExtenZe is all about the fun."

 

 

In the commercial, the former Dallas Cowboys and Miami Dolphins coach notes that ExtenZe isn’t about "not being enough; it’s about maximizing what you already have." Johnson shares the screen with Mixed Martial Arts fighter Pat Mitetich and NASCAR driver Kevin Conway. Johnson and Conway kid about being pressed by everyone they meet for product samples.

 

 

ExtenZe was the leading direct TV commercial on television in 2009, according to Infomercial Monitoring Service rankings, InterMedia Group noted. ExtenZe, for which InterMedia’s subsidiary InterQuantum handles retail chain marketing and distribution, now is in Walmart, Walgreens, CVS, Rite Aid and GNC. The product also scored No. 1 in sales in the mineral supplement category at retailers for the past 104 weeks, according to InfoScan Reviews, InterMedia Group added.

 

 

The new ExtenZe spots will air on ESPN, BET, Discovery, AMC, FX and Speed Networks, among others.

 

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Enzymedica encourages consumers to take digestive health challenge

BY Michael Johnsen

PORT CHARLOTTE, Fla. Enzymedica on Tuesday launched a campaign to drive awareness around enzymatic therapy as a way to improve overall digestive performance through the company’s 14-day “Take the Digest Challenge!”

 

For consumers taking the challenge, Enzymedica recommended its Digest Basic formula along with every meal or large snack for 14 days. Within the first two weeks, consumers should realize reduced digestive distress, increased energy and improved regularity, the company stated.

 

 

“Enzymes perform a multitude of functions in the body,” noted Kelly Crinnion, a representative for Enzymedica. “They aid everything from digestion to healthy energy levels. A daily enzyme supplement like Enzymedica’s Digest Basic provides the body [with] needed support,” she said. “Promoting proper digestion will encourage a healthy intestinal environment. … This can help relieve occasional constipation and irregularity.”

 

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Internet is go-to for health-and-wellness information, study shows

BY Michael Johnsen

NEW YORK The types of websites consumers turn to for health-and-wellness information and the reasons they go online for such information are greatly influenced by the stage of the condition they are experiencing and varies by ailment type, age and gender, according to research released Wednesday by Kantar Media.

 

“The Internet has become the source people turn to for health information,” stated Jayne Krahn, VP consumer health and custom research for Kantar Media. “While much is known about website visitation and patterns, less is known about the why and when, in terms of ailment conditions and stages,” she said. “This in-depth information … can help marketers and content creators better plan, position and develop creative. It also has relevance for magazine publishers looking to demonstrate how their digital offerings can provide unique reach and build frequency for advertisers.”

 

 

While health-information websites were used more often than search engines across all stages of the 40 ailments covered in the study, search engines were the preferred next option at early stages of a condition. However, for those recently diagnosed, in recovery or living with an ongoing condition, websites dedicated to a particular condition were preferred over search engines.

 

 

Online behavior also is defined by type of ailment when it comes to those sites best able to drive visitors back. For example, the study found that those who used the Internet for diabetes information were twice as likely to go back to websites that offered helpful tools or connected them to a larger community of people with the same condition. Sites that offer easy access to medical professionals are favored by those researching cardiovascular or respiratory conditions.

 

 

Findings also indicated that men and women use online health research differently. Nearly 84% of women researched for someone else, compared with 75% of men who researched for others. When it comes to reading reviews or ratings about doctors, however, men were just as likely to do so as women.

 

 

With regard to age, 18 to 34 year olds were more likely to go online to find healthcare professionals and read reviews or ratings about physicians, while those older than 50 years sought information about a condition or treatment after visiting a doctor.

 

 

The analysis comes out of the MARS 2010 Online Behavior Study. The study, conducted among more than 5,000 respondents in the second quarter of this year, is an extension of the 2010 MARS OTC/DTC Study.

 

 

Among other findings:

  • Of the 178 million Americans who have gone online in the past month, more than 89% have used the Internet for health research, with the typical user being female and younger than 50 years of age;
  • The primary reason for going online for health information was to gain general knowledge about a condition (71%), followed by researching symptoms that either the individual or someone else was experiencing (59%);
  • 56% of respondents said a healthcare professional recommendation makes a health website trustworthy, followed by 46% who said the inclusion of academic articles or scientific research does, and 39% who said having information that is easy to understand does;
  • 79% said that they felt the Internet provides a wealth of resources when they are searching for health-and-wellness information, while 74% said they were very cautious about which websites they accessed for health-and-wellness information; and
  • For those recently diagnosed with a condition, 77% said they first turned to online sources for information, second only to 81% who said they turned to a healthcare professional. Nearly 51% relied on magazines, pamphlets or other print publications.

 

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