BEAUTY CARE

Jan Marini discontinues its eyelash enhancer

BY Antoinette Alexander

SAN JOSE, Calif. Looking to untangle itself from FDA conflicts and a patent dispute with drug maker Allergan, beauty company Jan Marini Skin Research has reportedly pulled the plug on its cosmetic product designed to make eyelashes look longer.

According to a Wall Street Journal report, the California manufacturer recently began notifying customers that it would no longer offer its Age Intervention Eyelash Conditioner in the United States. Chief executive officer Jan Marini told the WSJ that the move will allow the company to focus on the rest of the skin care product business.

As reported by Drug Store News in November, the FDA had seized nearly 13,000 tubes of the company’s Age Intervention Eyelash because the product may, in some users, lead to decreased vision.

According to the FDA, Age Intervention Eyelash was considered an unapproved and misbranded drug because it was promoted to increase eyelash growth. Before a new drug product may be legally marketed, it must be shown to be safe and effective, and approved by the FDA.

The company ceased manufacturing and shipping in 2006 any Age Intervention Eyelash product containing bimatoprost.

In February 2007, Jan Marini Skin Research released a reformulated product named Age Intervention Eyelash Conditioner. According to the company, the reformulated product does not contain bimatoprost or any other prescription drug ingredient.

Marini told the WSJ that she isn’t aware of any safety complaints related to either the original formulation or the new one.

Also of concern was a brewing dispute with Allergan regarding patents. Allergan is believed to be testing an eyelash product called Lumilash modeled on its glaucoma treatment Lumigan, the WSJ reported. In November, Allergan sued seven eyelash-product companies alleging patent infringement.

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Gillette, Palomar extend decision schedule for light-based hair removal device

BY Antoinette Alexander

BURLINGTON, Mass. The Gillette Co. and Palomar Medical Technologies, a developer of light-based systems for cosmetic treatments, have reached an agreement to extend the launch decision of a home-use, light-based hair removal device for women and have agreed to negotiate new terms.

The date has been extended to no later than Feb. 29, 2008. Under the existing agreement entered into by Palomar and Gillette in February 2003 and as amended and restated in February 2007, Gillette had until Jan. 7, 2008 to make the launch decision. The companies have agreed to enter into negotiations for a new agreement to replace the existing one.

The goal of the new agreement is to enable the parties to continue to work together to fully capitalize on the market potential, the companies stated. It is anticipated that a new agreement would include the release of Palomar from exclusivity and the retention by Gillette of non-exclusive rights to Palomar’s technology and intellectual property. In return, Palomar anticipates that there would be a reduction in the percentage of net sales that Gillette pays to Palomar and a change from annual payments to reduced calendar quarterly payments for a certain period. If the parties do not agree, the existing agreement could be terminated.

Designed specifically for use in the home and based on more than a decade of research, the consumer light-based hair removal device marks a breakthrough in the aesthetic device industry and is the first light-based hair removal device to receive a 510(k) OTC clearance from the FDA, according the companies.

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VIOlight introduces iZAP toothbrush sanitizer

BY Antoinette Alexander

ELMSFORD, N.Y. VIOlight has extended its line of toothbrush sanitizing products with the introduction of the iZAP toothbrush sanitizer.

Battery-operated and made to accommodate a single toothbrush, the iZAP is ideal for use at home, office or travel. The sanitizer uses ultra-violet germicidal technology that promises to destroy up to 99.9 percent of bacteria that harbor on the toothbrush, according to the company.

How it works: Insert the rinsed toothbrush into the iZAP case and close the top to activate the sanitizing UV light. Ten minutes later the cycle shuts off automatically and the toothbrush is sanitized, dry and ready to use. It works with all manual and most electric toothbrush heads.

The product is available in three colors and a free toothbrush is included in each pack, which has a suggested retail price of $19.95. The iZAP is sold in single peggable units or in a 12-pack POP display that communicates its message in a 5-second read.

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