HEALTH

Inverness sells vitamins, supplements business

BY Michael Johnsen

WALTHAM, Mass. Inverness Medical Innovations on Tuesday announced the sale of its vitamin and nutritional supplements business to International Vitamin Corp. for an approximate $63.4 million.

The sale includes Inverness Medical Nutritionals and IVC Industries and constitutes Inverness’ entire vitamin and nutritional supplements business segment. Inverness sold the assets of the business, which include manufacturing facilities N.J.

Through the first nine months of 2009, the business generated net revenues of $63.6 million and contributed an operating loss of $2.4 million.

As a result of the sale, Inverness’ vitamin and nutritional supplements business segment will be presented as a discontinued operation in its financial statements for the fiscal year ended Dec. 31, 2009.

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HEALTH

FDA warns consumers about counterfeit Alli

BY Michael Johnsen

ROCKVILLE, Md. The Food and Drug Administration on Monday issued a warning to consumers about a counterfeit and potentially harmful version of the over-the-counter weight-loss medicine Alli 60-mg capsules.

Preliminary laboratory tests conducted by GlaxoSmithKline — maker of Alli — revealed that the counterfeit version did not contain orlistat, the active ingredient in its product. Instead, the counterfeit product contained the controlled substance sibutramine. Sibutramine is a drug that should not be used in certain patient populations or without physician oversight.

Sibutramine also can interact in a harmful way with other medications the consumer may be taking.

Consumers began reporting suspected counterfeit Alli to GSK in early December 2009. GSK has determined that the counterfeit product has been sold over the Internet. If a retailer has only purchased product from GSK there should be no cause for concern, GSK stated. “There is no evidence that counterfeit Alli products have penetrated other distribution channels [outside of Internet sites],” GSK added. However, there is no evidence at this time that the counterfeit Alli product has been sold through other such channels as retail stores.

The counterfeit Alli product looks similar to the authentic product, with a few notable differences. The counterfeit Alli has:

  • Outer cardboard packaging missing a “Lot” code;
  • Expiration date that includes the month, day and year (e.g., 06162010) — authentic Alli expiration date includes only the month and year (e.g., 05/12);
  • Packaging in a plastic bottle that has a slightly taller and wider cap with coarser ribbing than the genuine product;
  • Plain foil inner safety seal under the plastic cap without any printed words — the authentic product seal is printed with “SEALED for YOUR PROTECTION;” and
  • Contains larger capsules with a white powder, instead of small white pellets.

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MuscleMaster.com announces voluntary recall of 17 dietary supplements

BY Michael Johnsen

NORTHBOROUGH, Mass. MuscleMaster.com last week recalled 17 of its dietary supplement brands sold between June 1, 2009, and Nov. 17, 2009, following a communication from the Food and Drug Administration that the products in question may contain ingredients that are steroids.

Specifically, the FDA advised MuscleMaster.com of its concern that the recalled products may contain the following ingredients that are currently classified, or that the FDA believes should be classified, as steroids: “Superdrol,” “Madol,” “Tren,” “Androstenedione” and/or “Turinabol.”

While MuscleMaster.com cannot independently confirm the FDA’s concerns that any one or more of the recalled products in fact contain these ingredients, “MuscleMaster.com is undertaking this voluntary recall out of an abundance of caution and in deference to [the] FDA’s stated concerns,” the online retailer stated.

MuscleMaster.com is an Internet retailer and did not manufacture or formulate these products, the company further stated. “MuscleMaster.com’s decision to implement this recall is not, and should not be construed as, an admission that their decision to sell these products was in violation of the law. In addition it is not, and should not be construed as, an admission that these products are not in compliance with the law.”

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