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Intel survey: Patients ready to embrace personalized medicine

BY Michael Johnsen

SANTA CLARA, Calif. — Personalized medicine is on the horizon, and patients are not only awaiting it optimistically, but they also are willing to share a bit of personal information when it comes, according to a new study released Monday commissioned by Intel. 

"Most people appear to embrace a future of health care that allows them to get care outside hospital walls, lets them anonymously share their information for better outcomes and personalizes care all the way down to an individual’s specific genetic makeup," said Eric Dishman, Intel fellow and general manager of the company’s Health and Life Sciences Group. Intel’s research revealed that what people want most at the intersection of health care and technology is more personalized care based on their own behaviors and biology that provides the freedom to get health care wherever and whenever it’s convenient for them.

More than 70% of respondents are receptive to using toilet sensors, prescription bottle sensors or swallowed monitors to collect ongoing and actionable personal health data, according to the survey — the "Intel Healthcare Innovation Barometer" that was conducted across eight countries by Penn Schoen Berland. As many as 66% of people would prefer a personalized healthcare regimen designed specifically for them based on their genetic profile or biology. And 53% of those surveyed said they would trust a test they personally administered as much or more than if it came from a doctor.

"Technologies such as high-performance computing and big data analytics have the power to change the face of health in this world, and most people seem to desire that," Dishman said. "When given a choice between getting the same care as others who have their symptoms or getting care based on their own genetic profile, two-in-three respondents choose customized care."

People also indicated willingness to share their information to advance the field of medicine and lower costs for all. The survey revealed an overwhelming majority of people (84%) globally would anonymously share their personal health information, such as lab results, if it could lower medication costs or overall cost to the healthcare system. 

"Improving health care is a team effort, including patients and their families," Dishman added. "Intel’s research shows when people see benefits for them and their wider community, they are open to sharing sensitive information in anonymous ways."

In fact, a higher percentage of people said they are more willing to share their health records (47%) than their phone records (38%) or banking information (30%) to aid innovation. 

As many as 57% of people believe traditional hospitals will be obsolete in the future. Technology innovation holds the promise of unburdening people from having to see a healthcare provider in person for many aspects of their healthcare management, liberating people from the conventional restraints of time and location.

"Care must occur at home as the default model, not in a hospital or clinic," Dishman said. "New technologies can bring decision support, health monitoring and health coaches into the home. It was also interesting to see that people in emerging markets such as Brazil, China and India trusted themselves to use health monitoring technologies more than those in more technologically advanced economies such as Japan and the United States." 

Seventy-two percent of those surveyed are willing to see a doctor via video conference for non-urgent appointments. As remote healthcare technology and self-monitoring tools improve, people may embrace technologies that will allow them to connect with their caregivers in new ways, such as sensor technology that transmits health data in real time. Today’s technologies, such as social networks and video conferencing, can help people embrace new behaviors.

The survey was conducted online by Penn Schoen Berland on behalf of Intel in Brazil, China, France, India, Indonesia, Italy, Japan and the United States from July 28 to Aug. 15. It was conducted among a representative sample of 12,000 adults ages 18 years and older.

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Marianne Cooper to keynote AWMA Women’s Leadership Initiative Kickoff

BY Ryan Chavis

FAIRFAX, Va. — The American Wholesale Marketers Association announced that sociologist and women’s work expert Marianne Cooper will be the keynote speaker at the AWMA Women’s Leadership Initiative Kickoff Breakfast, to be held on Feb. 27 at the 2014 AWMA Marketplace and Solutions Expo in Las Vegas.

Cooper, who serves as a research associate at the Michelle R. Clayman Institute for Gender Research at Stanford University, was lead researcher for Sheryl Sandberg’s book, "Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead." Cooper writes, speaks and consults on gender, work, family life and social inequality.

Cooper will share a behind-the-scenes glimpse into the issues and research discussed in "Lean In." She’ll also highlight the barriers women face in their climb to the top and offer tips on what can be done to help women to achieve their goals.

“AWMA is launching its new Women’s Leadership Initiative because we recognize the importance of providing support to the many women who are rising in the ranks of our member companies and who will play an increasingly important role in our industry in the future,” AWMA President and CEO Scott Ramminger said.

The Women’s Leadership Initiative is part of AWMA’s freshly redesigned convention format, which will feature an array of educational and networking opportunities.

The complete details of the show can be found at AWMAMarketplace.com.

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David Cheesewright named Walmart International chief

BY Vivian Gomez

Currently president and CEO of Walmart’s Europe, Middle East and Africa (EMEA) and Canada region, David Cheesewright has been promoted to president and CEO of Walmart International, the company’s second-largest operating segment.

Cheesewright will report to Doug McMillon, who was tapped to succeed Mike Duke as the company’s president and CEO. Both assume their new roles Feb. 1, 2014. Cheesewright’s successor will be named at a later date.

"David will lead the division at an exciting time," said McMillon. "We have strengthened our business and gained market share in the majority of our international markets, and he had a key role in that success. He brings a wealth of experience and a proven track record of innovation and governance. With his deep knowledge of the company, our customers, and our purpose, he is the ideal person to steer our next chapter of continued, long-term growth. David’s passion for sustainability will drive change that will help improve our world."

"I’m honored to be named to lead our international business at a time when our customers around the world need us more than ever," said Cheesewright. "A tremendous opportunity lies ahead for our company. Our success is dependent on our associates, and I’m committed to investing in them. Together, we will find innovative and sustainable ways to serve our customers and provide them with the quality, affordable products they expect from us. Through strong capital discipline, we will continue to invest in new stores and e-commerce growth, as well as productivity improvements that drive profitable growth and returns."

Cheesewright’s career spans more than 25 years across the international retail and manufacturing sectors. His Walmart career began in 1999 at Asda, the company’s U.K. operation, where he held leadership positions in operations, merchandising, logistics, strategy and format development. He was the COO for both Walmart Canada and Asda before being named CEO of Walmart Canada. While there, Cheesewright is credited with leading the growth of the company’s Canadian operations, including bringing Walmart’s highly successful supercenter format to the Canadian market and expanding the company’s e-commerce capabilities.

In 2011, he was named to his current position as president and CEO of Walmart’s EMEA and Canada region, where he oversaw the integration of the Massmart acquisition in Sub-Saharan Africa and more aggressive growth in the U.K. through the Netto stores acquisition. He helped develop and expand Asda’s online grocery delivery program and serves on the board of Walmart’s China e-commerce business, Yihaodian. Before his career with Walmart, Cheesewright held leadership positions in the United Kingdom with Mars Confectionery. He holds a first-class honors joint degree in sports science and mathematics from Loughborough University, England.

Walmart’s International division generates nearly 30% of the company’s revenue, serving more than 109 million customers every week in more than 6,200 retail units under 64 banners in 26 countries outside the U.S. In the third quarter 2013, Walmart International grew net sales to $33.1 billion. On a constant currency basis, net sales increased 4.1% to $34.4 billion.

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