PHARMACY

ICPT announces release of updated National Pharmacy Technician Training Program manual

BY Allison Cerra

ST. CHARLES, Mo. The Institute for the Certification of Pharmacy Technicians has updated its National Pharmacy Technician Training Program manual.

The manual, now in its seventh edition, is designed to improve pharmacy technicians’ success and the role they play in promoting medical safety, ICPT said.

Those program manual changes include:

  • Additional material as recommended in the model curriculum to assist programs interested in pursuing programmatic accreditation
  • More than 200 additional pages of information (nearly a 70% increase) divided into 18 logical, easy-to-follow chapters
  • Training at three levels to help candidates focus their studying: Introductory, certification and career development
  • New chapters on common disease states, basic pharmacology and non-sterile compounding
  • Expanded chapters on basic medical terminology and basic anatomy and physiology that now cover additional organ systems, disease states and information on physiology and drugs
  • Expanded sections: patient interaction skills, destruction of controlled substances, most-abused prescription medications, controlled substances table, drug diversion, calculations and medication use in pregnancy
  • Revised chapters: patient communication, medical terminology, anatomy and physiology and sterile compounding
  • A new workbook and self-assessment questions that allow candidates to review prior to testing

 “We have used the National Pharmacy Technician Training Program as part of our formal training course since the beginning,” said Mayur Shah, CEO of MRxI Corp. “We looked at other books and feel this best serves our technicians’ needs. We are pleased the book continues to be updated and our feedback is taken to heart.”

The new “The National Pharmacy Technician Training Program-7th Edition” retails for $60 but is available for an introductory offer of $52, plus shipping and handling.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

PHARMACY

‘Silent strokes’ linked to kidney failure in diabetics

BY Alaric DeArment

WASHINGTON Tiny areas of brain damage caused by injury to small blood vessels can signal an increased risk of kidney disease and kidney failure, according to a new study by Japanese researchers.

Publishing in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, researchers led by Takashi Uzu of the Shiga University School of Medicine in Otsu, Japan, included 608 patients with Type 2 diabetes, all initially free of symptomatic stroke, heart disease or kidney disease.

Using magnetic resonance imaging scans of the brain, the researchers found that 29% of the patients had the small areas of brain damage, known as silent cerebral infarction or “silent stroke.” A long-term follow-up of the patients found that those with SCI had higher risks of progressive kidney disease, and compared with those who had normal MRI scans, patients with SCI were about 2.5 times more likely to die or develop end-stage kidney disease.

“Silent cerebral infarction may be a new marker to identify patients who are at risk for declining kidney function,” Uzu said in a statement.

Uzu said that small amounts of the protein albumin present in the urine – a condition known as microalbuminuria – are the most important market to predict the progression of kidney disease in diabetics, but decreased kidney function without microalbuminuria is common in those with Type 2 diabetes. According to the new study, diabetics with SCI were more likely to develop serious kidney disease regardless of the protein condition.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

PHARMACY

Decision Resources: Spiriva to remain clinical gold standard as COPD treatment

BY Alaric DeArment

WALTHAM, Mass. A drug from Boehringer Ingelheim and Pfizer will retain Decision Resources’ status as a gold standard of treatment for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease through 2018, according to a report released by the market research firm Tuesday.

While some COPD drugs in development held promise, they lacked the same efficacy, safety and tolerability and delivery features of Spiriva (tiotropium bromide), according to the report, titled “Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: Opportunity Exists for Combination Therapies that Offer Improved Convenience and Outcomes.”

“Our survey of primary care physicians indicates that a drug’s effect on quality of life improvement is the attribute that most influences PCPs’ prescribing decisions in moderate to very severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease,” Decision Resources analyst Amy Whiting said.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES