HEALTH

Hyperglycemia could cause Type 2 diabetes in acutely ill patients, study finds

BY Alaric DeArment

NEW YORK Heightened blood sugar during critical illnesses could be a sign of risk for Type 2 diabetes, according to a recent study by researchers in Croatia.

 

The study, conducted by researchers at University Hospital Centre Rebro and published in the journal Critical Care, followed 591 patients for five years after their discharge, dividing them into a group of 398 who had normal blood sugar levels during their hospital stays, and a group of 193 who developed hyperglycemia during their stays. Of the patients with normal blood sugar, 14 developed Type 2 diabetes, while among those who had hyperglycemia, 33 developed the disease.

 

 

“Despite the fact that endocrine and metabolic changes probably occur in all acutely ill patients, evident hyperglycemia is not always present,” lead researcher Ivan Gornik said. “We hypothesized that hospital-acquired hyperglycemia can therefore reveal a patient’s predisposition to impaired glucose control, which could in [the] future lead to diabetes.”

 

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Enzymedica encourages consumers to take digestive health challenge

BY Michael Johnsen

PORT CHARLOTTE, Fla. Enzymedica on Tuesday launched a campaign to drive awareness around enzymatic therapy as a way to improve overall digestive performance through the company’s 14-day “Take the Digest Challenge!”

 

For consumers taking the challenge, Enzymedica recommended its Digest Basic formula along with every meal or large snack for 14 days. Within the first two weeks, consumers should realize reduced digestive distress, increased energy and improved regularity, the company stated.

 

 

“Enzymes perform a multitude of functions in the body,” noted Kelly Crinnion, a representative for Enzymedica. “They aid everything from digestion to healthy energy levels. A daily enzyme supplement like Enzymedica’s Digest Basic provides the body [with] needed support,” she said. “Promoting proper digestion will encourage a healthy intestinal environment. … This can help relieve occasional constipation and irregularity.”

 

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New PowerBar High Intensity rolls into retail

BY Michael Johnsen

FLORHAM PARK, N.J. Nestle Performance Nutrition on Tuesday announced its entry into the sport dietary supplement category with the launch of a line of dietary supplements under the brand PowerBar Elite Series High Intensity. Formulated with sustained-release beta alanine for endurance, the line will carry the NSF Certified for Sport certification for sports nutrition products.

 

"With studies published in the last couple of years, the amino acid beta alanine appears to be joining a small list of nutritional ingredients with good scientific support for helping athletes perform at their best," stated Eric Zaltas, business development director for Nestle Performance Nutrition. "Providing the sustained-release form of beta alanine and gaining NSF certification were important considerations for us as we move into the sports dietary supplement category."

 

 

Studies suggest beta alanine supplementation can enhance performance in efforts lasting between one minute and 10 minutes, such as cycling over the top of a hill, high-intensity interval training or in sports events falling within this range.

 

Each PowerBar High Intensity two-tablet serving provides 1.6 g of beta alanine. For optimum results, athletes should take two tablets twice daily for the first four weeks and two tablets once per day thereafter. With this regimen, athletes typically see results in four to eight weeks.

 

The supplement started shipping in September through sports specialty retailers and PowerBar.com for a suggested retail price of $39.99 per 56-serving bottle.

 

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