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Heart Chocolate appeals to diabetics

BY Tara Smith

TORONTO Innovative Life Sciences Corporation recently launched Heart Chocolate with CM-X, positioning it as a product that, aside from containing no sugar and few calories, provides significant health benefits for diabetics and others.

The chocolate, which provides CM-X, contains a natural proprietary compound of cinnamon and bitter melon extracts that have been developed by the company for the treatment of diabetes and related cardiovascular diseases.

According to Maggie Laidlaw, director of the Clinical Trial Division of Nutrasource Diagnostics Inc. and former associate director of Human Nutraceuticals at the University of Guelph, the bitter melon and cinnamon extracts help reduce blood glucose levels, increase glucose tolerance in diabetics and those with metabolic syndrome, reduce total and LDL cholesterol, as well as triglycerides.

Heart Chocolate was launched during the 2007 Toronto International Film Festival with sales exceeded expectations‹more than 600 bars were sold each weekend.

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Poll shows recalls of Chinese goods spark little change in consumer behavior

BY Adam Kraemer

NEW YORK Despite the recent furor over the quality of Chinese goods being imported into the U.S., sometimes even resulting in recalls, it has not greatly affected the buying behavior of the American public, a New York Times/CBS News poll discovered.

The poll, conducted Oct. 12-16, found that while 71 percent of the 1,282 respondents claimed to be aware of the country of origin of a product, nearly as many—65 percent—had not stopped buying Chinese goods. Of the rest, 14 percent claimed to have stopped buying Chinese goods because of the recent recalls and 9 percent claimed that they simply did not buy goods from China.

In addition, 35 percent said they felt that products imported from China were more dangerous than those from other countries. However, 20 percent more of the respondents (and the majority at 55 percent) felt that Chinese products only seemed more dangerous because of the recent news.

Even more telling, in comparison with a Gallup/CNN/USA Today poll from 1996, the percentages who rated Chinese goods on a scale from “Excellent” to “Poor” remained within the current poll’s margin of error of 3 points. The percent who responded “Only Fair” did not change at all from 11 years ago. The percent who rated the goods “Poor” in 2007 increased by 3 percent, but that was balanced by the combined increase of 3 percent on the side of “Excellent” and “Very Good.”

Full results and the poll’s methodology are available at nytimes.com/polls.

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Neilsen estimates more than $2 billion spent on Halloween candy in the U.S.

BY Allison Cerra

SCHAUMBURG, Ill. The Nielsen Co. has unmasked the truth about Halloween candy.

The global information and media company anticipates that U.S. consumers will spend over $2 billion on candy this Halloween, and that sizes do not matter, but rather, the quantity.

“There’s no doubt about it; when doorbells ring October 31, consumers respond with candy, and lots of it,” said Todd Hale, senior vice president of Consumer and Shopping Insights, Nielsen Consumer Panel Services. “The quantities are big, but the sizes are small. Our review of the Halloween seasons shows that the overwhelming majority of consumers choose to give miniature candy to trick-or-treaters.”

Nielsen also concluded that, out of 52 markets in the United States, the Salt Lake City/ Boise metropolitan area bought 80 percent more candy than expected.

Nielsen did say, however, despite the profits stores make on selling candy (October and April are the biggest candy-selling months), most consumers are more likely to purchase candy only a few days prior to the holiday (Oct. 29 is considered the top-selling day).

Additionally, 97 percent of households purchase candy at least once a year, while 85 percent of candy is purchased in grocery stores.

“For retailers and manufacturers, Halloween is a concentrated selling period for seasonal items,” Hale said. “Consumers [are] putting a strong showing at the cash register.”

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