HEALTH

Hayes’ role expands at Bayer HealthCare’s consumer care division

BY Michael Johnsen

MORRISTOWN, N.J. Timothy Hayes, currently SVP and region head for Bayer HealthCare’s consumer care division in North America, also will lead the business unit’s global business development function effective July 1, the company announced Monday.

In addition to his role leading Bayer HealthCare’s over-the-counter drug business in the United States, Canada and Puerto Rico, Hayes will now also oversee new business development for Consumer Care’s global brand portfolio and markets — identifying and analyzing new and emerging opportunities and developing short- and long-term strategic plans for business growth. This includes but is not limited to, acquisitions, in-licensing and Rx-to-OTC switches to drive continued, leading growth for this important division of Bayer HealthCare’s diversified business.

“[Hayes’] demonstrated leadership of the North American business over several years includes many successfully executed market growth strategies,” stated consumer care president Gary Balkema. “In his new role, [Hayes’] experience will be invaluable as he leads business development globally for consumer care.”

Hayes’ career has spanned nearly 30 years in the consumer products industry. He joined Bayer consumer care in 1992 and has held positions of increasing responsibility in trade marketing, sales and strategic business management. Prior to his current position, he served as SVP consumer care U.S.A.

Hayes has also been active through the OTC manufacturer’s association the Consumer Healthcare Products Association. He served as vice-chair for CHPA from 2002-2003, chair-elect from 2003-2004 and chairman from 2004-2006. Additionally, he has been a member of CHPA’s board and executive committee since 2000.

Hayes similarly is an active member of the board of directors for the Healthcare Business Women’s Association. And he previously served as vice chairman of the American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education until February 2010. In addition, his history of service includes terms on the National Association of Chain Drugstores Advisory Board and chairmanship of the American Heart Association Morris County Heart Walk.

Hayes received his B.A. degree in business and marketing from Furman University, Greenville, S.C., in 1980. Hayes is a father of three and now resides in Chester, N.J., with his wife, Susan, and youngest son.

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Slo-Niacin.com educates visitors about heart disease, cholesterol management

BY Michael Johnsen

MAPLE GROVE, Minn. Upsher-Smith on Monday announced the launch of Slo-Niacin.com, an information portal for cholesterol management.

The site educates visitors about heart disease and includes "Cholesterol Basics," a guide to interpreting cholesterol levels and facts about common heart disease risk factors. The website also reviews recommendations on how to optimize cholesterol management, along with tips to leading a healthy lifestyle, including fitness, nutrition and how the integration of a supplement containing nicotinic acid, like the company’s Slo-Niacin brand, can support overall heart health.

 

"We know how important it is to be informed when it comes to managing overall heart health," stated Tina Fehr, product manager for Slo-Niacin. "The new website gives visitors easy access to credible information about cholesterol management, along with an improved store locator for the ultimate convenience on where to buy Slo-Niacin and how to obtain … coupons."

 

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Cigarette use among high school students on slow decline

BY Michael Johnsen

ATLANTA As many as 1-in-5 high school students are still smoking, according to a report published last week in the Center for Disease Control and Prevention’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

Current cigarette use among high school students nationwide began to decline in the late 1990s, but the rate of decline slowed from 2003 to 2009. Since 2003, the rate of decline in current cigarette use slowed or leveled off for all of the racial/ethnic — white, Hispanic, and black — and gender subgroups, except black female students for whom rates of current cigarette use showed no slowing or leveling off after 1999.

Because of this slower rate of decline, the United States has not met its national 2010 health objective of reducing cigarette use among high school students to 16% or less. “Although 4-of-5 don’t smoke, it’s discouraging to see that current smoking did not continue to decline more rapidly among youth,” stated CDC director Thomas Frieden. “Smoking is the leading preventable cause of death in this country, and 9-out-of-10 adults started smoking in their teens or earlier. The slow progress since 2003 tells us that much more needs to be done to reduce youth smoking.”

The report found that the percentage of students who reported current cigarette use increased from 27.5% in 1991 to 36.4% in 1997, declined sharply to 21.9% in 2003, and declined more gradually to 19.5% in 2009.

Effective strategies to address cigarette smoking by young people include expanded counter-advertising mass media campaigns; reduction to tobacco advertising, promotions and availability of tobacco products; tobacco-free environments; programs that promote changes in school norms and higher tobacco prices through state excise tax increases, the CDC suggested.

For an online version of the MMWR report, visit CDC.gov/mmwr.

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