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Greenway Health completes Walgreens Cloud EHR

BY Michael Johnsen

CARROLLTON, Ga. — Greenway Health on Wednesday announced the completion of one of the largest centralized pharmacy cloud-based electronic health-record systems ever deployed, Walgreens Cloud EHR. Walgreens has completed its chain-wide rollout of the Greenway Health-powered EHR solution, giving pharmacy staff at all of its more than 8,200 locations a single, complete view of patients’ prescription, immunization and health testing records.
 
The EHR platform further enables Walgreens pharmacists to identify opportunities to close gaps in care and to share patient information with other providers, helping to ensure continuity and care coordination.
 
“Having a chain-wide EHR platform enhances our pharmacists’ ability to provide individualized immunization and health testing recommendations, which is key to closing gaps in patient care that exist today,” stated Tim Theriault, SVP, chief information, innovation and improvement officer, Walgreens. 
 
Walgreens Cloud EHR operates in real-time mode and is fully interoperable with various systems within Walgreens’ operational IT infrastructure. The interoperable functionality and scale of the system supports an emerging trend in healthcare to leverage real-time electronic communication to deliver high-quality care.
 
“Consumers are demanding access to healthcare information, and Walgreens Cloud EHR delivers,” commented Greenway CEO Tee Green. “We’re proud to work with Walgreens to deliver a single system that extends to more than 27,000 pharmacists and can process 20,000 patient encounters per hour. This implementation points the way to electronic care coordination of the future.”
 

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Study: Low-dose aspirin lowers the occurrence of new venous blood clots

BY Michael Johnsen

SYDNEY — Low-dose aspirin lowers the occurrence of new venous blood clots — and represents a reasonable treatment option for patients who are not candidates for long-term anticoagulant drugs, such as warfarin, according to a new study published in Monday's issue of Circulation.
 
"The study provides clear, consistent evidence that low-dose aspirin can help to prevent new venous blood clots and other cardiovascular events among people who are at risk because they have already suffered a blood clot," stated the study's lead author, University of Sydney professor John Simes. "The treatment effect of aspirin is less than can be achieved with warfarin or other new generation direct thrombin inhibitors, which can achieve more than an 80% reduction in adverse circulatory and cardiopulmonary events," he said. "However, aspirin represents a useful treatment option for patients who are not candidates for anticoagulant drugs because of the expense or the increased risk of bleeding associated with anticoagulants."
 
Compared to placebo patients, those who took 100 mg daily of aspirin had a one-third reduction in the risk of:
 
  • Thromboembolism, which is the obstruction of a blood vessel by a clot that has dislodged from another site in the circulation;
  • Deep vein thrombosis, which is the formation of a blood clot in a deep vein, predominantly in the legs;
  • Pulmonary embolism, which is a blood clot affecting the arteries that supply blood to the lungs; and
  • Myocardial infarction (heart attack), stroke or cardiovascular death.
 
Most people who have had a blood clot in a leg vein (i.e., deep-vein thrombosis) or an embolism (i.e., where the clot blocks the blood flow) have anticoagulant drug treatment (e.g., warfarin) for at least six months, first to dissolve the clot and then to prevent it happening again.
 
However, long-term anticoagulant drugs are expensive and inconvenient, requiring frequent regular blood tests and adjustments to the dosage. Further, there is an elevated risk that the treatment could cause bleeding in some patients. For people who are not able to cope with this, the viable alternative of taking regular aspirin will be a great benefit, Simes noted.
 
"The study provides evidence that after a first venous thrombosis or embolism, daily aspirin reduces the risk of another event, without causing undue bleeding. This treatment is an alternative to long-term anticoagulation and will be especially useful for patients who do not want the inconvenience of close medical monitoring or the risk of bleeding," Simes said. "Aspirin will be ideal in the many countries where prolonged anticoagulant treatment is too expensive. A major benefit of this treatment is its cost-effectiveness. Aspirin is cheap, but it will save the treatment costs of the many recurrent clots that are prevented. This could mean a saving of millions of healthcare dollars worldwide."
 

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CHPA names new CFO

BY Michael Johnsen

WASHINGTON — The Consumer Healthcare Products Association on Monday announced that Brian Green will join CHPA as VP finance and operations and CFO. Green will begin his duties on Sept. 2, 2014.
 
Reporting to CHPA president and CEO Scott Melville, Green will direct CHPA’s finance management, human resources, information technology, meetings and administration functions. He also will serve as a member of the association’s senior management team.
 
“I’m delighted Brian will be joining CHPA in a senior leadership role,” Melville said. “He brings a strong track record in financial and operations management that will help to strengthen and grow our association.”
 
A graduate of University of Northern Iowa, Green is a certified public accountant who served as CFO, VP for the Building Owners and Managers Association International for nearly a decade, where he directed all finance, administration, information technology, research activities of the association, as well as administered one of the major member programs.

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