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GMDC names new member services manager and communications specialist

BY Michael Johnsen

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. — GMDC on Thursday added two staff members to enhance their services to its membership, the association announced. Jason Weber has been named the new member services manager and Joshua Manweiler the new communications specialist.

"The addition of these gentlemen delivers a skillset that is complimentary to the GMDC strategy and will continue to build upon the driving force of innovation that GMDC has embarked on throughout the past two years," stated Dave McConnell, GMDC president and CEO. "The connection between our members in doing business well is paramount, and GMDC’s education programs and marketing efforts, as well as attracting new members for our retailers, is key in building our strengths. Both Jason and Josh’s background fit well, and will be an asset to GMDC conferences and activities." 

Weber joined the association as the member services manager, reporting to the senior manager of member services, Vickii Barnard. Weber started with Dillon’s/Kroger in 1993 in distribution services for both non-perishable and perishable warehouses. In 1999 he worked as a buyer for Kroger, buying across general merchandise, HBC and seasonal. 

From that point Weber became operations manager for Ultimate Athletic, working with partners such as ESPN, Olympic Governing Bodies, Food & Wine, Cotton Bowl and Sugar Bowl, developing branded merchandise lines and managing on-site and e-commerce sales. And in 2008, he returned to Kroger as inventory superintendent with a third party partner Advantage Logistic/Supervalu.

Manweiler will be working alongside the communications department director, Mark Mechelse, and will be responsible for managing media, content writing and editorial, trade press material and advertising, and to effectively build the GMDC brand, products and services to its members and prospects.

Prior to working for GMDC, Manweiler worked with a nonprofit association in Colorado Springs that was focused on education and safety. His position included managing the organization’s technology infrastructure, communications, event coordination, government affairs and website development. Manweiler has also served as an IT Specialist for the College of Engineering at the University of Colorado for five years, and has his Bachelor’s of Arts in political science and a Master’s Degree in public administration from the University of Colorado.

 

 

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Martin’s Food Markets appoints veteran nutritionist at Md. store

BY Alaric DeArment

CARLISLE, Pa. — A Maryland Martin’s Food Markets store has hired a professional nutritionist to assist customers with questions on healthy eating, provide consultations and teach classes.

Martin’s, part of Giant Food Stores of Carlisle, Pa., itself owned by Ahold USA, said it hired Elisabeth D’Alto for its Eldersburg, Md., store. D’Alto is the owner of D’Alto Nutrition, a nutrition communications and consulting company and previously served as a clinical dietitian with Genesis Healthcare in Baltimore, as well as newsletter editor for the Dietitians in Business and Communications.

"Martin’s is committed to providing customers with the information they need to achieve healthier lifestyles, and having an in-store nutritionist like Elisabeth is a valuable resource in helping customers make better choices as they navigate the grocery aisles," Martin’s director of marketing and external communications John MacDonald said.

 

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Study finds significant increase in drug approvals for neglected diseases

BY Alaric DeArment

BOSTON — Almost twice as many drugs for neglected diseases have received regulatory approval around the world over the past few years compared with the beginning of the last decade, according to a new study.

Tufts University’s Center for the Study of Drug Development found that between 2000 and 2008, an average of 2.6 new drugs were approved to treat neglected diseases each year, a number that increased to five per year between 2009 and 2012. Drugs for HIV/AIDS, malaria and tuberculosis accounted for 81% of the the products in development, while HIV/AIDS and malaria accounted for 60% of recent approvals. The study appeared in the Tufts CSDD July-August Impact Report.

"The trend in approvals is clearly going in the right direction, but annual research-and-development spending to treat neglected diseases has leveled off at $3 billion in total after rising rapidly from 2000 to 2007, which is a cause for concern," Tufts CSDD assistant professor and lead study author Joshua Cohen said. "While increased approvals may result in greater access to new medicines, policy makers need to ensure that safe, effective and easy-to-administer products are adopted by healthcare systems, that they are affordable and that they reach the people who need them."

 

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