PHARMACY

Gene mutation, Type 2 diabetes linked in study

BY Allison Cerra

CATANZARO, Italy — A new study revealed that a single gene mutation might be the cause of Type 2 diabetes.

For individuals of white European descent, certain variations of the gene HMGA1 are associated with Type 2 diabetes, according to Antonio Brunetti of the University of Catanzaro in Catanzaro, Italy, and colleagues. They found that among Italian, American and French patients, 7% to 8% of Type 2 diabetes patients in all three populations had the gene mutation. The study authors noted, however, that "further studies of the HMGA1 gene and its variants, including studies in other racial types, are needed to understand the role of HMGA1 in insulin resistance and Type 2 diabetes."

The study appeared in the March 2 issue of Journal of the American Medical Association.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

PHARMACY

Oral contraceptive Emoquette wins FDA approval

BY Alaric DeArment

HUNTSVILLE, Ala. — A subsidiary of Endo Pharmaceuticals has won approval from the Food and Drug Administration for an oral contraceptive.

Qualitest Pharmaceuticals announced Friday the approval of Emoquette (desogestrel and ethinyl estradiol) tablets in the 0.15-mg/0.03-mg strength.

The drug is a generic version of Johnson & Johnson’s Ortho-Cept.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

PHARMACY

FDA: Topiramate could pose birth defects risk

BY Alaric DeArment

SILVER SPRING, Md. — Pregnant mothers taking a common drug for treating epilepsy may be putting their babies at risk, according to a new report from the Food and Drug Administration.

The FDA said Friday that the drug topiramate could increase the risk for such birth defects as cleft palate and cleft lip when used by expectant mothers. Johnson & Johnson markets the drug under the name Topamax, and it is available in generic form.

“Healthcare professionals should carefully consider the benefits and risks of topiramate when prescribing it to women of childbearing age,” FDA Division of Neurology Products director Russell Katz said. “Alternative medications that have a lower risk of birth defects should be considered.”

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES