BEAUTY CARE

Gaining some beauty prestige

BY Antoinette Alexander

Beauty market research company the NPD Group recently reported that total prestige makeup dollar sales in U.S. department stores were on the rise during the first 10 months of 2011, and gift sets proved to be no exception.

Between January and October, total prestige makeup dollar sales in U.S. department stores were $2.8 million, an increase of 8% in dollars compared with the same time last year. All prestige segments saw dollar growth.

Separately, in data sent to Drug Store News, NPD also reported a rise in gift sets for skin care, fragrance and makeup between January and September.

Total prestige skin care gift sets totaled $189.6 million, up 25% in dollar sales from the same period of 2010.

Total prestige fragrance gift sets totaled $372 million, up 2% in dollar sales compared with the year-ago period.

Total prestige makeup gift sets were $78.7 million, up 10% in dollar sales compared with the year-ago period.

 

 

The article above is part of the DSN Category Review Series. For the complete Gift Sets Sell-Through Report, including extensive charts, data and more analysis, click here.

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BEAUTY CARE

Dr. Miracle’s celebrates brand overhaul

BY Antoinette Alexander

With a new CEO at the helm and a revamped line of hair care products, ethnic beauty brand Dr. Miracle’s had a lot to celebrate during its stylish bash at the Sky Room in New York City in November.

Beauty press and bloggers were among those who gathered at the chic rooftop lounge on Nov. 9 to celebrate the product relaunch and take in the city view.

As reported by Drug Store News in September, Dr. Miracle’s is evolving beyond hair repair positioning and driving the brand forward with a relaunch comprised of multitiered innovation initiatives and updates to formulas, packaging and advertising.

“First and foremost, we’ve increased our understanding of our consumer, learning more about why she likes our brand and why she uses our products. The answer: Our products have helped her repair her hair. So she knows firsthand that our products work,” said Dr. Miracle’s CEO Randy Zeno. “Our new direction will build on these findings to show her that in addition to helping her get healthy hair, Dr. Miracle’s [also] can help her keep it healthy and beautiful.” Zeno, a former Reynolds Consumer Products executive, joined Dr. Miracle’s as CEO in September 2010.

Perhaps the most noticeable development is the brand’s evolution of appearance at store level. The revamped packaging redesign reflects Dr. Miracle’s efforts to increase consumer shopability, and highlights product benefits, attributes and key ingredients. The brand’s logo also has been updated.

In addition, formulas have a new, milder, citrusy aroma and have been reformulated to include vitamins and such natural ingredients as shea butter, aloe, coconut, jojoba and olive oils.
In addition to product development, the brand is channeling its understanding of its consumer into a new advertising campaign, event outreach campaigns, marketing efforts and digital programs.

 

 

The article above is part of the DSN Category Review Series. For the complete Ethnic Beauty Buy-In Report, including extensive charts, data and more analysis, click here.

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Ingredients grab attention of ethnic personal care shoppers

BY Antoinette Alexander

Skin care brands that contain such ingredients as shea butter, olive oil and tea tree oil could be missing an opportunity among ethnic consumers, according to research company Mintel.

In Mintel’s “Blacks and Personal Care – U.S.” report dated March 2011, the research company found that just one-third of African-American adults use body and facial care products that are designed specifically for ethnic skin, despite the fact that a variety of brands exist. Mintel believed that the findings suggested that specially designed skin care products are not as important to ethnic shoppers as are other factors like the ingredients.

For example, shea butter is an ingredient that is recognized as a natural and very effective moisturizer that can help battle dry skin. Not all lotions or body washes that contain shea butter are designed specially for African-American consumers, but such products are likely very attractive to this consumer segment.

In light of the findings, Mintel suggested that skin care products already containing such ingredients as shea butter, olive oil, cocoa butter and tea tree oil could be attractive to African-American consumers.

“Marketers should ask themselves, ‘In what way does [my product] address the personal care issues of African-Americans?,’ including dry body skin, oily complexions, irritation and allergic reactions, razor bumps, body acne, scarring, hyper-pigmentation and others,” the research stated.

With regard to anti-aging products, products that claim to offer a more even skin tone and firmer skin, and that correct deep wrinkles — all without clogging pores — likely would appeal to this segment, Mintel added. Those issues typically faced by aging African-American complexions include loss of elasticity, deep expression lines, hyper-pigmentation and other blemishes, dark circles around the eyes, and pouches under the eyes.

 

 

The article above is part of the DSN Category Review Series. For the complete Ethnic Beauty Buy-In Report, including extensive charts, data and more analysis, click here.

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