PHARMACY

Fred’s tests smaller pharmacy-centric format

BY DSN STAFF

MIDDLETON, Tenn. — Fred’s Super Dollar is testing a smaller box Fred’s, complete with a pharmacy, as a potential growth engine going forward.

It’s half the size of a typical 16,000-sq.-ft. Fred’s location, with a lot of merchandising emphasis being placed on the Fred’s pharmacy. Pharmacy is seen as a growth catalyst for the company; 36.4% of Fred’s sales are comprised of prescription medicines, the Memphis-based retailer stated.

Fred’s also opened two 8,000-sq.-ft. GetWell Drug and Dollar concept stores before Thanksgiving with four more pilot openings planned by year’s end.

For more photos, click here.

 

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Generics expected to hit double-digit growth this year

BY Alaric DeArment

The world market for generic drugs will jump more than 15% this year and reach a global total of $127.8 billion, a British market research firm predicted.

A report from Visiongane, “Generic Drugs: World Market 2013-2023,” estimated that branded drug manufacturers will see a $50 billion decline in total revenues this year as patents expire and generic competitors slice up the sales pie for more of the world’s biggest-selling medicines. “A number of factors have contributed to the growth of the world generics market,” Visiongain senior pharmaceutical industry analyst Syed Ahmed said. “Prominent blockbuster drugs will lose patent protection in the next few years, with many having done so already.”

Sales of generics in the United States represent more than 40% of worldwide sales and account for about 70% of prescriptions dispensed within the country, while sales here have more than tripled since 2000, according to the report.

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‘Pay for delay’ deals will face review by SCOTUS

BY Alaric DeArment

The nation’s highest court has agreed to hear three cases stemming from the longstanding but controversial practice by which branded and generic drug makers agree to delay introduction of a me-too medicine as its brand-name counterpart nears the end of its patent protection. A ruling by the Supreme Court could alter the delicate balance sometimes struck between the two industries as they scramble to either delay or hasten the onset of generic competition for big-selling, patented drugs.

The high court revealed in December it would take up the cases, which stem from court challenges filed by the Federal Trade Commission and some pharmacy chains over the practice of so-called reverse payments. Critics deride the settlements, by which a generic manufacturer will agree to delay introduction of a cheaper alternative to a branded drug facing the end of its patent life, in return for monetary or other compensation.

Such “pay for delay” settlements, challengers assert, illegally reduce competition and cost U.S. consumers and health plan payers $3.5 billion a year in higher-than-necessary drug costs.

Three generic companies — Watson Pharmaceuticals, Par Pharmaceuticals and Solvay Pharmaceuticals — are bundled into the case the high court will take up, possibly in March.

Typically, when a generic drug company wants to be the first to market a generic version of a drug, it will file for Food and Drug Administration approval for it before the branded drug has lost patent protection. This usually prompts a patent-infringement lawsuit from the branded drug company, and while the suits often go to trial, in many cases, they will result in a settlement that allows the generic drug maker to launch at a later date.

While the “pay” part of the deal may be monetary, it frequently consists of a promise on the part of the branded drug maker not to market an authorized generic — essentially the branded drug marketed at a discount under its generic name, usually by a third-party company — during the 180-day market exclusivity period to which generic companies are entitled if they are the first to win approval for a generic, when they have the sole right to compete against the branded version.

Among critics of the practice: FTC chairman Jon Leibowitz, who said the agreements “leave American consumers footing the bill.” Both branded and generic drug groups, however, counter that reverse payments get drugs into the hands of consumers faster than they would if the patent-infringement suits went to court.

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