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Former USC Pharmacy dean, Allergan pioneer Biles dies

BY David Salazar

SAN DIEGO — John Biles, who led the University of Southern California’s School of Pharmacy for 27 years, died June 27. During his time at USC, Biles cultivated a partnership between the school and Allergan.

Born in Del Norte, Colorado, Biles attended the University of Colorado, earning a Ph.D in chemistry, teaching at various universities before joining USC’s faculty as an assistant professor in 1952.

It was around this time that Biles was tapped by Allergan to help recreate the original formulas for its allergy products following the unexpected death of the chemist who had devised the formulas.

“There would be no Allergan today had John not recreated those formulas,” Allergan’s co-founder and former chairman, Gavin Herbert said at an event in 2012 celebrating the partnership between the school that emerged after Biles recreated Allergan’s formulas.

Since 1977, Allergan has offered fellowships to recently graduated Ph. D and PharmD interested in learning more about the field.

In his time at USC, Biles also established several joint degree programs, allowing Doctor of Pharmacy candidates to earn MBAs or certificates in gerontology simultaneously.

“The imprint of Dean Emeritus John Biles on our school is deep and strong,” said School of Pharmacy Dean R. Pete Vanderveen. “He truly stands as one of the nation’s greatest-ever pharmacy deans. Pharmacists from USC and nationwide owe him a great debt of gratitude.”

Biles is survived by his wife of 71 years, Margaret, as well as their daughter and two grandsons.

There will be a memorial service for Biles on Sept. 20 at the Pacific Palisades Presbyterian Church in Pacific Palisades, California. Donations can be made to the church in lieu of flowers.

Photo/courtesy of USC School of Pharmacy

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My Cabana Boy named ‘Best New Product’ at ECRM Sun Care

BY Antoinette Alexander

TAMPA, Fla. — Desert 2 Desert has been named the winner of the DSN-sponsored “Best New Product” award at the ECRM Sun Care, currently taking place in Tampa, Fla., for its My Cabana Boy sunscreen applicator.

My Cabana Boy is a universal wand that attaches to continuous spray bottles to help users properly apply product to the body including the hard-to-reach spots such as the back, shoulders and legs. In addition, the ergonomic design helps reduce overspray that can result in mess and waste. The first-to-market, patent-pending device works with all standard sunscreen and self-tanning sprays currently on the market.

Benefits include:
• Adjustable design fits with any of brand of continuous spray product including Banana Boat, Bullfrog, Coppertone, Neutrogena store brands and more;
• Also works with self-tanning sprays and the newly launched lotion sprays from Vaseline;
• Adds several inches of reach and works from any angle so you can easily and accurately spray the hardest to reach spots, such as your back;
• Trigger spray for maximum control even when your hands are wet;
• Ergonomic design allows you to directly target intended spray area — saving you product;
• Lightweight and durable, the tool is reusable and travel friendly; and
• Especially great for expectant mothers and those with mobility issues.
 
My Cabana Boy can be purchased on My-CabanaBoy.com for $13.99 and at Ricky’s NYC. The product is made in America and is available in the following colors: blue, yellow, orange and green.

Also at ECRM Sun Care, Energizer Personal Care won for “Best Room” and Sun & Skin Care Research won for “Most Prepared.”
 

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Industry speaks out against mandate requiring manufacturers to fund unused medicine take-back programs

BY Michael Johnsen

WASHINGTON — Current programs to dispose of unused medicines in the home are sufficient, argued representatives of industry in appealing a provision put into place by a San Francisco-area county that would place the burden of recapturing these medicines on the manufacturer. 
 
Counsel for the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America, joined by the Biotechnology Industry Organization and the Generic Pharmaceutical Association, last week participated in oral arguments in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit, in appeal of the district court ruling in favor of Alameda County's Safe Drug Disposal ordinance, which requires pharmaceutical companies to bear the full burden of designing, funding and operating a collection program in the county for unused medicines in the home.
 
"This proposed approach is impractical, inefficient and reflects an attempt on the part of the county to directly, significantly and unconstitutionally regulate companies whose connection with Alameda is nothing more than having introduced federally-approved products into interstate commerce," the associations stated."We support safe disposal of medications, and today consumers have several options available to them that are considered safe and effective by both the FDA and DEA. These methods include various means of convenient in-home disposal, as well as take back days organized by local and national law enforcement agencies, among others."
 
Requiring manufacturers to fund take-back sites is "unfair cost-shifting," the groups argued. "We remain confident in our legal position, and look forward to continued collaboration with local leadership to address patient safety and disposal concerns."
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