HEALTH

FlavoRx, RDC ink deal

BY Michael Johnsen

COLUMBIA, Md. — FlavoRx and Rochester Drug Cooperative on Thursday announced a long-term distribution agreement designed to bring the FlavoRx brand to more than 950 independent pharmacies serviced by RDC throughout New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Ohio and Connecticut.

At the same time, RDC expects the FlavoRx product line, including the new Fillmaster Plus, to provide its customers with unique offerings that add to the value it already brings to independent pharmacies in the region.

“We are delighted to partner with RDC to better serve the needs of independent pharmacies in the region,” stated Natasha Hobson, FlavoRx director of accounts. “The team at RDC has a deep understanding of the independent pharmacy market and truly cares about the continued success of [its] customers. Adding FlavoRx and Fillmaster to [its] portfolio is a progressive step that will give [its] customers access to unique products designed to enhance workflow and customer service while improving patient outcomes.”

As part of the partnership, RDC representatives now will offer the new Fillmaster Plus, a pharmacy device that automates drug reconstitution.

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HEALTH

OTC industry homogenizes concentration of APAP liquids for kids

BY Michael Johnsen

WASHINGTON — The Consumer Healthcare Products Association on Wednesday announced plans to convert liquid pediatric acetaminophen products to just one concentration.

This voluntary change means the current children’s strength of liquid acetaminophen (160 mg/5 mL) will become the only liquid concentration available for all children younger than 12 years, and the current concentrated infant drops no longer will be sold.

“CHPA member companies are voluntarily making this conversion to one concentration to help make it easier for parents and caregivers to appropriately use single-ingredient liquid acetaminophen,” stated CHPA president and CEO Scott Melville. “We are committed to providing parents and caregivers with the tools and information they need to help give their children the right amount of these medicines.“

CHPA and its members will be working to ensure healthcare providers have the information they need to help answer parents’ questions about the change. During the transition, the makers of these medicines also will work with retailers to ensure that, as the new medicines are introduced, the more concentrated infant drops will be removed from store shelves.

The single-concentration liquid medicines will have additional enhancements to their age-appropriate dosing devices. Specifically, infants’ products will have syringes for more accurate dosing and flow restrictors. Children’s products, for kids ages 2 years to younger than 12 years, will continue to offer dosing cups.

APAP is the most commonly used children’s medicine for relieving pain and reducing fever, according to the CHPA. The transition will begin in mid-2011.

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FDA sets standards for liquid OTC dosage devices

BY Michael Johnsen

SILVER SPRING, Md. — The Food and Drug Administration on Wednesday released the Dosage Delivery Devices for Orally Ingested OTC Liquid Drug Products guidance, which outlines how easy-to-use dosage delivery devices and devices that minimize the risk of unintentional overdose can be provided for such over-the-counter medicines as liquid pain relievers, cold medicine, cough syrups and digestion aids.

"Accidental medication overdose in young children is an increasingly common, but preventable public health problem," stated Karen Weiss, program director for the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research’s Safe Use Initiative.

Key recommendations in the guidance include:

  • Dosage delivery devices should be included for all orally ingested OTC liquid drug products;

  • Devices should be marked with calibrated units of liquid measurement (e.g., teaspoon, tablespoon or milliliter) that are the same as the units of liquid measure specified in the directions for the product and there should not be any unnecessary markings;

  • Manufacturers should ensure that dosage delivery devices only are used with the accompanying products; and

  • Liquid measure markings on dosage delivery devices clearly should be visible and not obscured when the liquid product is added to the device.

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