HEALTH

Film boosts homeopathy awareness

BY Michael Johnsen

NEW YORK — This fall, homeopathy may get a boost in awareness and acceptance among American consumers with the screening of “Just One Drop,” a documentary that addresses critics of homeopathy head on, and shares the story behind the medicinal practice.

“Homeopathy has been maligned and misrepresented for 200 years,” said Laurel Chiten, director and principle at Blind Dog Films. “All I am trying to do with this film … is give homeopathy a voice — a voice that continues to be misinterpreted.”

The National Center for Homeopathy is among those hosting screenings across the nation, from New York and Philadelphia to Berkeley, Calif. “The film aims to dispel myths and encourage audiences to reset and rethink about homeopathy,” the association stated. “It sheds light on the benefits of homeopathy and ultimately supports a passionate community. …”

To many, homeopathy seems implausible. They fear it is purely a placebo effect. Yet, homeopathy is used by millions of people around the world. The film explores the controversy, reveals the rich history, dispels myths and misconceptions, and asks whether or not homeopathy has been given a fair shake.

“I want ‘Just One Drop’ to open up a dialogue, get people talking to each other, asking questions and sharing information,” Chiten said.

“This documentary will change our game in the most exciting of ways,” NCH said. “[It] sheds light on the benefits of homeopathy and ultimately supports a passionate community.”

 

“Just One Drop” screenings
DATE THEATER CITY
Sept. 25, 2017 Regal Village at the Pearks 12 Longmont, Colo.
Sept. 25, 2017 Regal Hudson Valley Mall 12 Kingston, N.Y.
Sept. 25, 2017 Regal Bridgeport Village Stadium 18 & IMAX Portland, Ore.
Sept. 25, 2017 B&B Theatres Windsor 10 Oklahoma City
Sept. 26, 2017 Regal Transit Center Stadium 18 & IMAX Buffalo, N.Y.
Sept. 26, 2017 Regal Burleson Movies Stadium 14 Burleson, Texas
Sept. 26, 2017 Regal Union Square Stadium 14 New York
Sept. 26, 2017 AMC Quail Springs Mall 24 Oklahoma City
Sept. 27, 2017 Regal Plymouth Meeting 10 Conshohocken, Pa.
Sept. 27. 2017 B&B Wylie 12 with Marquee Suites & GS

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Wylie, Texas
Oct. 4, 2017 Bow-Tie Cinemas Red Bank Theatre Red Bank, N.J.
Oct. 11, 2017 AMC Showplace Rockford 16 Rockford, Ill.
Oct. 12, 2017 Regal Peoples Plaza Stadium Newark, Del.
Oct. 12, 2017 Regal Green Hills Stadium 16 Nashville, Tenn.
Oct. 12, 2017 Landmark Theatres Main Art Theatre Royal Oak, Mich.
Oct. 16, 2017 Bow-Tie Cinemas Criterion Cinemas New Haven New Haven, Conn.
Oct. 17, 2017 Regal Berkeley 7 Berkeley, Calif.
Oct. 19, 2017 Regal Union Square Stadium 14 New York
Oct. 26, 2017 Bow-Tie Cinemas Palace 17 Hartford, Conn.
Nov. 1, 2017 Goodrich Quality 16 Ann Arbor, Mich.
Nov. 8, 2017 Regal Gallery Place Stadium 14 Washington

 

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Study finds use of homeopathic products helpful to maintaining health

BY Michael Johnsen

NEW YORK — Earlier this year, the Benson-Henry Institute published in the American Journal of Public Health a new survey examining the use of homeopathic medicines in the United States. The report found that homeopathy users, particularly those who also report visiting homeopathic practitioners, find the use of these products helpful, and that they tend to use a greater variety of complementary and integrative medicine modalities than do users of supplements and other complementary and integrative medicines, or CIMs.

The respondents who reported using homeopathy were more likely to be white, female, married, highly educated, ages 30 years old to 44 years old and live in the western United States than CIM users who did not use homeopathy. They also were more likely to report using other types of CIM, except for chiropractic or osteopathic manipulation, and to have used several different types of CIM.

While two-thirds of the 718 respondents who used homeopathy ranked it among their top three CIM therapies, only 19% reported seeing a homeopathic practitioner during the preceding year. One-third of homeopathy users — both those who did and did not consult practitioners — reported using homeopathy to address specific health conditions, most commonly head and chest colds. Those who did see a practitioner were significantly more likely to report that homeopathy was very important to maintaining their health, and that it had helped their health problem “a great deal.”

“We were a bit surprised to see how few homeopathy users reported seeing a practitioner, but I don’t think that is concerning since most use is for conditions that will resolve on their own and homeopathic medicines are generally very safe,” noted Michelle Dossett of the Benson-Henry Institute at Massachusetts General Hospital and lead and corresponding author of the paper. “Our data suggest that the likelihood of people using these products for serious conditions without input from a healthcare professional is low, and data from other groups suggest that most CIM use is in addition to, not in place of, conventional treatment.”

According to BHI, this is the first detailed report on the use of homeopathy in this country. Homeopathy is a 200-year-old system of medicine based on the principal of similars — that highly diluted substances can be used to treat symptoms similar to those that would be caused by large doses of those substances in healthy people. Interest in homeopathy has increased in recent years, the authors noted.

 

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HEALTH

SLIDESHOW: Shoppers Drug Mart debuts aging-focused Wellwise pilot

BY David Salazar

TORONTO, Ontario — In an effort to connect with Canada’s aging population, Shoppers Drug Mart this week will unveil its new pilot retail experience in Toronto’s Leaside neighborhood. The Wellwise store pilot will get a grand opening and ribbon-cutting ceremony on Saturday, Sept. 23.

With more Canadians over 65 years of age than under 15 years of age, Shoppers Drug Mart said the pilot focuses on giving patients control over the way they age in an environment that it said eschews the clinical experience of DME stores for a focus on aging gracefully. The store concentrates in there areas — experience, empowering and education (the store has a dietitian on staff).

The standalone, 3,500-sq.-ft. store’s inventory will encompass such categories as wellness (aromatherapy), recovery (first aid), mobility, home comfort, tools and gadgets, personal care and active living, which includes products for yoga, compression and light weights.

“We are going to change the conversation about how people age,” Shoppers Drug Mart SVP healthcare business Theresa Firestone told Drug Store News. “People don’t generally look forward to that part of life [and] this is an opportunity for people to look forward to that part of life, because you can age powerfully, you can take control and there are lots of ways you can be active and enjoy life.”

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