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Fight the Fakes anti-counterfeit medicine coalition adds 11 partners

BY Michael Johnsen

GENEVA — Following the campaign’s six-month anniversary, Fight the Fakes last week announced 11 new partners, bringing the total number of member organizations to 25. New partners, representing wholesalers, pharmacists, mobile app services, coalitions for consumer protection and generic pharmaceutical manufactures, join the campaign to speak up and spread the word about the impact of fake medicines. These organizations add to a diverse group of standing partners, including healthcare professionals, disease-specific organizations, research-institutes, product-development partnerships, foundations, non-profits and the private sector.

The 11 new partners include the Alliance for Safe Online Pharmacies, the Alliance for Safe Online Pharmacy in the EU, the Center for Safe Internet Pharmacies, the European Association of Pharmaceutical Wholesalers, the Generic Pharmaceutical Association, the International Federation of Pharmaceutical Wholesalers, the International Pharmaceutical Students Federation, Mobilium, the Partnership for Safe Medicines, PSM India and the Pharmaceutical Security Institute.           

Fight the Fakes partners believe that a comprehensive strategy to combat fake medicines requires an active participation that involves all stakeholders, leveraging competencies at local, national and global levels, the group stated. 

 

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Teva to move forward with generic equivalent of BMS’ Baraclude

BY Michael Johnsen

JERUSALEM — Teva Pharmaceutical Industries on Thursday announced that the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit upheld a ruling by the U.S. District Court for the District of Delaware finding Bristol-Myers Squibb’s entecavir compound claim of U.S. Patent No. 5,206,244 invalid. 

Teva’s abbreviated new drug application for entecavir, the generic equivalent to Baraclude (a medicine prescribed to treat chronic hepatitis B) has received tentative approval from the Food and Drug Administration. Teva will finalize the launch plans for this product once it receives final approval from the FDA.  

Baraclude is marketed in the U.S. by Bristol-Myers Squibb and had annual sales of approximately $314 million in the United States, according to IMS data as of March 2014, Teva reported.

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Study: Metformin with insulin associated with a higher risk of all-cause death

BY Michael Johnsen

CHICAGO — A study published Wednesday on JAMA‘s website found that diabetes patients taking metformin had a higher risk of all-cause death when insulin was added to their treatment as compared to when sulfonylureas were added to treatment.

"Among patients with diabetes who are receiving metformin, the addition of insulin compared with sulfonylurea was associated with an increased risk of a composite of nonfatal cardiovascular outcomes and all-cause mortality," wrote Christianne Roumie of the Nashville VA Medical Center. "These findings require further investigation to understand risks associated with insulin use in these patients and call into question recommendations that insulin is equivalent to sulfonylureas for patients who may be able to receive an oral agent."

According to the study, there was a moderately higher rate of death associated with patients who were treated with insulin and metformin. There was no statistical difference in the rate of cardiovascular death in those patients who had added insulin to their metformin regimen vs. those who had added sulfonylurea. 

Roumie concluded that there was no advantage to receiving insulin compared to a sulfonylurea medication, and that there was some risk in treating with the combination of metformin plus insulin.

 

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E.Price says:
Jun-13-2014 09:21 am

Glad to hear that diabetes drugs are being studied, especially metformin. Doctors all over the world say things like, It's a gray liver drug. Is that supposed to make me feel confident that it won't kill me?! Knowledge is power, and with obesity up so high in the US, diabetes drugs are in high demand. Keep up the good work!

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