BEAUTY CARE

Female baby boomers get online, not in line, for beauty

BY Antoinette Alexander

CHICAGO —The online beauty market is poised to explode, and it’s likely that the techsavvy teen and young adult won’t be driving the significant growth. According to a recent report by Mintel, the female baby boomers will be behind the wheel—or the mouse, in this case.

“Female baby boomers are one of the largest beauty care segments, known for their spending power, proactive health habits and dedication to product research,” stated Kat Fay, senior analyst at Mintel. “In fact, these women spend 13 or more hours online a week, making the online market a powerful resource if retailers can get boomers to log on.”

In the Mintel “Beauty Retailing” study, 1-in-10 of the 1,020 female respondents—all ages 18 years or older—reported using some type of online retailer to purchase cosmetics and skin care aids, and as the female population ages, the female boomer population is expected to increase by 30.9% from 2005 to 2015.

When strictly looking at online sales, 8% of those surveyed visit mass merchandiser sites for beauty products, 8% order from Target.com, 8% from Walmart.com, 5% patronize such drug store sites as CVS or Walgreens, and 8% visit other unnamed online retailers.

Creativity of online beauty retailers has contributed to the continued growth of the Internet market. Fay noted that “innovations like virtual makeovers, new product tweets and online-only sweepstakes draw in consumers and provide them with benefits and discounts they can’t find in an actual brick-and-mortar store.”

Mintel noted that, with the continued popularity of Twitter, Facebook and VideoEgg, beauty retailers can use social-networking platforms to measure consumer preferences and tailor their sites to appeal to online shoppers.

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Mack Elevation Forum examines how NOT to become SKU-rationalized

BY Rob Eder

SAN DIEGO It’s a new game. And the winners are the ones that follow the new rules of the game. That was how Swanson Group VP Dan Mack teed up the discussion here, Friday morning, at the Hilton Bayfront Hotel, for the latest edition of The Mack Elevation Forum.

The share group — which merged with the Swanson Group last November — organized and coordinated by Mack, brings together executives from noncompeting, generally smaller to mid-sized companies to examine critical business issues with the ultimate goal of enabling participants to align their sales and marketing strategies with the broader vision of the retailers they do business with. In all, executives from more than 20 different supplier companies were in attendance.

Among other things, the new rules, Mack explained, dictate that the pie of which suppliers fight to secure a share is smaller than it once was as retailers focus on growing their store brands; the new “value” consumer continues to grow in number — and value isn’t always defined by price; social media continues to level the playing field from a brand marketing standpoint, even as SKU rationalization does its best to shrink the playing field; and customer loyalty has reached an all-time low.

Special retailer guest, Bill Bergin, VP health and beauty for Rite Aid, provided attendees with an insider’s view of how suppliers can better engage Rite Aid, and shared details of key programs — such as the chain’s newly introduced Wellness+ customer loyalty card program, which the company began rolling out in May — that are priorities for Rite Aid.

Picking up on the theme of Drug Store News’ June 6 issue cover story, “7 Deadly Sins of SKU Rationalization,” Mack Elevation Forum attendees focused a good deal of the discussion around the topic of SKU rationalization — and, more importantly, how smaller vendors can keep out of the crosshairs.

To some extent, SKU rationalization has been a bit a of self-fulfilling prophesy, explained Vic Mazzacone, CEO of Drive Medical Design and Manufacturing, retail division. “The supplier community set the table for the radical SKU rationalization that is currently occurring,” he said, citing a lack of “real innovation. And overzealous marketers created a stream of new products that did not grow the segment and only traded sales. Too many brands are truly not differentiated, which makes them vulnerable.”

Dan Quail, VP sales for Similasan, noted that in one of his key business segments, the ear category, there historically have been six to seven other manufacturers competing within the section. “With some retailers, there are now only three manufacturers competing in the section,” Quail said. “It was a perfect case of companies not being differentiated and diluting the overall performance of the section.”

The bigger question, of course, is not so much what caused SKU rationalization, but what suppliers can do to keep from having their items eliminated. “Suppliers must understand emerging consumer trends and stay on the forefront of meeting evolving consumer needs,” said Mike Barna, VP sales for First Boston Pharma. “By staying out in front of the curve, you have the opportunity to create new products in growth segments where retailers are more willing to invest … and [you] are also more insulated against rationalization.”

Audie Rudiger, VP sales for Wahl, noted that the 80-year-old clipper company utilizes data from Zoomerang to identify consumer preferences, and uses that information to help support why its products must be a part of the planogram. Rudiger also recommended the online consumer survey service Questback.com for deeper qualitative and quantitative consumer feedback, and QuestionPro for more complex consumer research.

Another strategy for maintaining an item’s place on the shelf is to demonstrate that item’s contribution to the overall market basket, or the value of the trip the item generates, or that the value of that shopper is higher than the category norm, noted Tina Jackse, senior director of national accounts for Beiersdorf. “Try to establish if your brand — if not on the shelf — encouraged the consumer to leave the store.”

In the end, it is important for suppliers to leverage all of their assets to bring constant value back to the retailer. “Winning companies are bringing products to their retailer partners, but they also provide context on national best practices and are students of the important societal shifts,” Mack explained. “They understand that the game is about bringing ideas that help retailers build customer loyalty, drive trips and encourage in-store conversion. Companies offering these type of assets build strong brands and are more immune to being delisted.”

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New Burt’s Bees products to hit Target shelves

BY Antoinette Alexander

NEW YORK Burt’s Bees is launching several new products at Target stores in July.

There’s the new Burt’s Bees cranberry and pomegranate sugar scrub, which will retail for $12.99. This 100% natural body scrub exfoliates to reveal silky, ­soft skin. Natural sugar crystals polish away dead skin cells, while a blend of cranberry seed and pomegranate oil, infused with vitamins and essential fatty acids, nourishes skin. Shea butter, olive oil and soybean oil provide a triple moisturizer effect.

New to the lip care category is Burt’s Bees nourishing lip balm with mango butter ($3).The 100% natural lip balm is specially formulated with mango butter to soothe, moisturize and protect to reveal smooth, healthy lips. To also nourish lips is the new Burt’s Bees rejuvenating lip balm with acai berry ($3). This 100% natural lip balm is made with the superfruit acai berry to provide free radical-fighting antioxidants and vitamins A, C, D and E, as well as omega oils.

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