PHARMACY

FDA wants more oversight of compounding pharmacies

BY Alaric DeArment

NEW YORK — Food and Drug Administration commissioner Margaret Hamburg is asking Congress to give the agency more power to regulate compounding pharmacies amid a nationwide meningitis outbreak linked to a Massachusetts-based compounding pharmacy that has claimed dozens of lives nationwide.

According to a draft of testimony submitted ahead of a hearing before the House Committee on Energy and Commerce, Hamburg detailed the FDA’s response to the outbreak, linked to contaminated steroid drugs from the New England Compounding Center in Framingham, Mass., and also the agency’s limited ability to regulate pharmacy compounding.

"[The] FDA’s ability to take action against compounding that exceeds the bounds of traditional pharmacy compounding and poses risks to patients has been hampered by gaps and ambiguities in the law, which have led to legal challenges to [the] FDA’s authority to inspect pharmacies and take appropriate enforcement actions," read a draft of Hamburg’s testimony submitted before the hearing.

As of Monday, the oubreak, linked to doses of the steroid methylprednisolone acetate contaminated with fungus, had sickened 438 patients and killed 32, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

In her testimony, Hamburg suggested greater federal oversight of what she called "nontraditional compounding," meaning pharmacy compounding of drugs that could potentially pose higher risks to patients for various reasons, such as sterile compounding, shipments of compounded drugs between states or dispensing through third parties. She said the FDA should have the power to collect and test samples of compounded drugs and examine compounding pharmacies’ records, as it does when inspecting other manufacturers and to require that pharmacies involved with nontraditional compounding register with the agency.

"Nontraditional compounding should, because of the higher risk presented, be subject to a greater degree of oversight, with the riskiest products subject to the highest level of controls, such as appropriate current good manufacturing standards established by [the] FDA," Hamburg’s testimony read.

Last month, the FDA released a copy of its inspection report of the NECC, saying that during an inspection of the pharmacy, inspectors found contaminated products and problems with the pharmacy’s ability to maintain its clean room, an enclosed space designed to have a controlled environment to ensure a sterile environment for drug compounding at the NECC’s Framingham, Mass., pharmacy.

The FDA said that the inspectors "observed conditions and practices that, in their judgment, may indicate violations of the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act, or related regulations," but that the report was not a formal determination that the NECC had committed any violations.

These included contamination with mold, bacteria and "foreign matter" in several areas and on equipment in the pharmacy designed to be kept sterile and sanitary. Inspectors found 83 vials of methylprednisolone acetate, the injectable steroid linked to the meningitis outbreak, that contained "greenish black foreign matter," while 17 contained "white filamentous material."


Interested in this topic? Sign up for our weekly DSN Collaborative Care e-newsletter. 

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon’s entry would shake up the most?
PHARMACY

Study finds fourfold increase in OxyContin prescriptions dispensed near U.S.-Canada border tunnel

BY Alaric DeArment

NEW YORK — The launch of a tamper-resistant formulation of a popular opioid painkiller in the United States, but not in Canada, may have influenced a spike in dispensing rate of the original at pharmacies in Canadian border cities, according to a study.

Researchers in Canada studies prescriptions dispensed from pharmacies at Niagara Falls, Windsor and Sarnia, Ontario, the cities with the highest volume of U.S.-Canada border crossings in the province. Analyzing data on outpatient prescriptions for Purdue Pharma’s OxyContin (oxycodone) extended-release tablets from April 2010 to February 2012, they calculated and compared monthly prescription rates, adjusted per 1,000 people. The study appeared online Tuesday in the Canadian journal Open Medicine.

The researchers found that the number of tablets dispensed near four border crossings in the three cities remained stable, but the rate of dispensing at pharmacies near the Detroit-Windsor Tunnel increased four-fold between August 2010 and February 2011, from 505 tablets per 1,000 people to 1,969, a number that declined to 1,683 in April 2011 following warnings to prescribers and pharmacies and then increasing again in November of that year. Overall, between August 2010 and October 2011, 242,075 "excess" tablets were dispensed near the Detroit-Windsor Tunnel.

According to published reports, the researchers were concerned about the effects that the launch of generic versions of OxyContin could have on health and safety as the drug, which remains a popular target for drug abusers and criminals, becomes more widespread.


Interested in this topic? Sign up for our weekly DSN Collaborative Care e-newsletter. 

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon’s entry would shake up the most?
PHARMACY

Abbott drug shows improvement in young adults with arthritis

BY Alaric DeArment

ABBOTT PARK, Ill. — Patients with a form of arthritis that affects young adults taking a drug made by Abbott experienced improvements in their condition after a year of treatment, according to late-stage clinical trial results.

Abbott announced Monday the first long-term patient-reported health outcomes data for the phase-3 "ABILITY-1" trial of Humira (adalimumab) in patients with nonradiographic axial spondyloarthritis, or nr-axSpA. Results of the trial were presented at the American College of Rheumatology’s annual scientific meeting in Washington.

The study showed that patients taking Humira experienced improvement in physical function and measures of health-related quality of life after 52 weeks.


 

Interested in this topic? Sign up for our weekly DSN Collaborative Care e-newsletter. 

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon’s entry would shake up the most?