HEALTH

FDA: Prolonged PPI use may increase risk of bone fractures

BY Alaric DeArment

SILVER SPRING, Md. Prolonged use of a common class of drugs for treating digestive problems may increase the risk of bone fractures, the Food and Drug Administration said Tuesday.

The FDA issued a warning to consumers and healthcare professionals based on a review of several epidemiological studies that long-term use of prescription and OTC proton-pump inhibitors or use of the drugs in high doses could increase the risk of fractures of the hip, wrist and spine. Information about the possible risks will be included on revised product labels for PPIs, the FDA said.

“Epidemiology studies suggest a possible increased risk of bone fractures with the use of proton-pump inhibitors for one year or longer, or at high doses,” FDA division of gastroenterology products deputy director for safety Joyce Korvick said. “Because these products are used by a great number of people, it’s important for the public to be aware of this possible increased risk and, when prescribing proton-pump inhibitors, healthcare professionals should consider whether a lower dose or shorter duration of therapy would adequately treat the patient’s condition.”

 

PPIs are used to great gastroesophageal reflux disease, ulcers, esophageal inflammation and heartburn. Prescription PPIs include AstraZeneca’s Nexium, which IMS Health ranks as one of the top-selling drugs in the world, with 2009 sales of $6.3 billion, and Takeda’s Dexilant (dexlansoprazole). OTC PPIs Prilosec OTC (omeprazole), marketed by Procter & Gamble, and Prevacid 24HR (lansoprazole), marketed by Novartis, under licenses from AstraZeneca and Takeda, respectively.

 

 

AstraZeneca spokesman Blair Hains told Drug Store News the company recently had received the notice from the FDA and would respond within the allotted 30 days.

 

 

“We’re all working toward the same thing,” Hains said. “We want prescribers and patients to have the best healthcare information that’s out there.”

 

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Abbott receives regulatory approval for FreeStyle Lite test strips

BY Allison Cerra

ALAMEDA, Calif. The Food and Drug Administration approved blood-glucose test strips from Abbott.

Abbott’s new FreeStyle Lite test strips use an enzyme which is unaffected by common nonglucose sugars, such as maltose or galactose, and minimizes the potential for other interference, Abbott said. The strips also are compatible with the company’s FreeStyle Lite blood-glucose monitoring systems.

“The new FreeStyle Lite test strips represent Abbott’s latest  success in delivering innovative products for people living with  diabetes,” said Heather Mason, SVP Abbott Diabetes Care. “Abbott is delivering on what patients and healthcare professionals demand in diabetes care, especially for people who use insulin to manage their diabetes.”

FreeStyle Lite test strips will be available in July.

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Bret Michaels raises $390K for American Diabetes Association

BY Allison Cerra

ALEXANDRIA, Va. The American Diabetes Association congratulated Bret Michaels on winning NBC’s “The Celebrity Apprentice” and raising $390,000 to further the association’s movement to stop diabetes.

Rock band Poison’s frontman — who has Type 1 diabetes — chose the American Diabetes Association as his charity during this season of “The Celebrity Apprentice.” The money that Michaels raised on the show will help support the American Diabetes Association, leading provider of diabetes camps.

“Nearly 24 million children and adults in the United States have diabetes and an additional 57 million are at risk,” said Larry Hausner, CEO, American Diabetes Association. “If current trends continue, one in three children will face a future with diabetes. We are proud of Bret’s win on the ‘The Celebrity Apprentice’ which will truly help the American Diabetes Association change the future of this disease.”

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