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FDA to healthcare professionals: Stop administering flu shots via jet injectors

BY Allison Cerra

WASHINGTON — The Food and Drug Administration on Friday issued guidance regarding the use of injector devices to administer flu vaccines to patients.

The FDA said that healthcare professionals should not use such clinical devices to administer flu vaccines, adding that all vaccines, including influenza, "be administered in accordance with their labeling."

"At this time, there are no vaccines for the prevention of influenza disease that are approved by the FDA for administration by jet injector … [they] have not been evaluated for delivery by jet injection," the FDA said in its guidance.

Only one vaccine is approved for administration via jet injector: the measles mumps and rubella vaccine (also known as MMR), the agency said, adding that it has no safety and efficacy data for other vaccines delivered by jet injector.

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Kroger discontinues needle-free flu vaccine offering

BY Allison Cerra

CINCINNATI — Kroger has discontinued offering needle-free clinical devices to administer flu vaccinations at all pharmacies and The Little Clinic locations.

Kroger said that its decision was based on guidance from the Food and Drug Administration that advised healthcare professionals not to use needle-free clinical devices to administer flu shots.

Kroger said it is seeking guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and the FDA regarding revaccinations.


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Jesse_EngAmer says:
Oct-25-2011 08:37 pm

FDA-approved vaccines have information in their labeling about how they should be administered, but doctors and other health professionals can opt for off-label use of medications if they believe it is in the best interest of their patientshttp://eng.am/vKYA5n This is a perfect example of the FDA working in the interests of Big Pharma and not the American public. The PharmaJet Jet Injector had been cleared for general use and its makers were coerced into pulling their product due to it's use with brand-name products. If it were dangerous at all, off-brand or on-brand it'd be outright banned. This is FDA working for profit.

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You better watch out: ‘Flash robs’ loom this holiday season

BY Allison Cerra

NEW YORK — There’s one trend that retailers should brace for this holiday season.

Despite projected spending outlooks made by several research and retail groups, retailers nationwide will draw crowds this holiday season. However, it seems that certain consumers (particularly, teenagers and young adults) have utilized the power of technology and social media to conduct "flash robs," a take on the impromptu gatherings known as flash mobs.

Last week, the National Retail Federation released its 2011 crowd management guidelines, which warned retailers to be mindful of these events. According to an NRF Criminal Flash Mob report, 10% of retailers said they have been a victim of this type of multiple offender crime.

"Traditionally, these multiple offender crime groups engage in grab-and-run scenarios where offenders quickly enter stores and target specific merchandise — such as high-end handbags, jewelry and designer clothing — then flee, sometimes to a waiting vehicle or, as was the case in several high profile incidents, using mass transit," NRF said on its website.

"Many families make holiday shopping an important tradition, and retailers’ main goal is to make that experience a safe and pleasant one," said Joe LaRocca, NRF senior asset protection adviser Joe LaRocca said. "Crowd management is not taken lightly for retailers, who plan ahead for months in anticipation of large events with practice runs, a well-trained staff, and a thorough analysis of the company and its customers."

The Wall Street Journal also cited several instances of "flash robs," including one at a Philadelphia-area Sears over the summer, as well as several stores in Chicago. Affected retailers included Armani Exchange, Filene’s Basement and The North Face.

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