PHARMACY

FDA accepts application for Takeda, Lundbeck antidepressant

BY Alaric DeArment

DEERFIELD, Ill. — The Food and Drug Administration has accepted a regulatory approval application from Takeda and Lundbeck for an experimental drug to treat depression, the companies said Wednesday.

The FDA will review the companies’ application for vortioxetine for the treatment of major depressive disorder in adults. The agency expects to finish reviewing the application by Oct. 2, 2013.

The application includes data from seven studies that included more than 7,500 patients ages 18 to 88 years. The companies have proposed marketing the drug under the name Brintellix if it wins approval.


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PHARMACY

Survey indicates growing importance of mobile health apps

BY Alaric DeArment

ANDOVER, Mass. — More than 10% of Americans consider Web-enabled, mobile health apps a part of their health care and key to living long lives, according to a new survey by a division of electronics manufacturer Philips.

Royal Philips Electronics commissioned Opinion Research to conduct a survey of 1,003 adults, finding that 11% said that were it not for Web-based health information, they might already be "dead or severely incapacitated."

"We are in the early stages of the Web-enabled, mHealth, mobile app world of healthcare delivery," Philips Healthcare chief medical officer Eric Silfen said. "Near-future apps will focus on tying together health information technologies, connecting with doctors, nurses, healthcare professionals and patients, all within a social context that facilitates shared medical decision making. This evolution will harken the new vital signs of the clinical times with technologies that help prevent medical errors, lower the financial and social cost of care, sustain a higher quality of medical practice and support an evidence-based standard for medicine in general."

The survey also found that a quarter of respondents use symptom-checker websites or home-based diagnosis technology as much as they visit the doctor, while another 27% use such applications instead of going to the doctor, and 41% said they were comfortable using websites to check their health symptoms. While 49% were comfortable with symptom checker technologies or home-based vital sign monitors automatically sharing information with their doctors, more than one-third believe technology that allows one to monitor personal health is now the key to living a long life.


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S.ALAM says:
Jul-03-2013 12:10 pm

More such apps should be created specially indicating basic primary health care including general guidelines of diabetes as well as food poisoning.

L.ROSE says:
May-16-2013 02:09 am

Completely appreciated with your approaches that emphasizes on the reason behind the growing importance of mobile healths apps with its advantageous features which are easily accessible in nature for them people having smartphone and tablets.This type of survey indicates the huge uses of this mobile health apps which increases the health care practices.Popularity of this apps is booming day by day known through such interesting review.Medifast shakes

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PHARMACY

GSK sponsors community health event in St. Louis, part of nationwide tour

BY Alaric DeArment

ST. LOUIS — GlaxoSmithKline is sponsoring a national campaign to investigate ways to build healthier communities in the United States and has made its latest stop, in St. Louis, the company said Wednesday.

The program, "A Conversation on Community Health," began in Philadelphia in September, with The Atlantic magazine acting as host and GSK underwriting it. According to the St. Louis Regional Health Commission, about 31% of adults in the city are obese, while the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America ranks the city among the 10 most challenging places to live with asthma, though the health commission estimates that 11.4% children there have been diagnosed with it.

"At GSK, we’re always asking ourselves what we can do to be a better partner in the communities in which we serve patients to ensure that they have the resources and opportunities they need to live healthier lives," GSK president for North America Pharmaceuticals Deirdre Connelly said. "While there are many innovative and effective local community programs doing great work across St. Louis and in other cities across the United States, we believe it’s possible to work together even more effectively to drive greater collective impact."

The events are designed to find ways health organizations, public officials, advocates and citizens can improve health at the local level. In St. Louis, The Atlantic will convene a summit of regional experts in medicine, public health, academia, government, business and philanthropy, including a panel discussion featuring such people as St. Louis Regional Health Commission CEO Robert Fruend; St. Louis Department of Health commissioner Melba Moore and others.


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