News

FaceLube, former boxing champ Victor Ortiz target Hispanic men with new ‘VO’ skin care line

BY Antoinette Alexander

LOS ANGELES — Men’s grooming brand FaceLube has teamed up with former welterweight boxing champion Victor Ortiz to launch an exclusive men’s anti-aging skin care line at La Curacao department stores.

La Curacao is best known as a growing chain of large format department stores of 100,000 sq. ft. each. With a Hispanic focus, La Curacao ranks among the top 100 electronics and appliance retailers in the United States. The retail store chain has nine locations in Southern California and one in Phoenix.

The new skin care line, dubbed “VO,” combines anti-aging ingredients with natural botanicals to boast an eco-friendly formula that is free of parabens, sulfates, fragrances, perfumes, dyes, silicones, polyethylene glycol and oxybenzones. The concentrated formula contains a combination of anti-aging active ingredients that promote healing and cellular turnover for optimal anti-aging benefits. Ideal for daily use, the sealed dispensers ensure maximum usage, minimizes oxidation and contamination.

“La Curacao is more than an active member of the Latino community. It’s commitment to providing Latino families with a warm and memorable experience has made La Curacao the most trusted name within the Hispanic retail market. FaceLube is ecstatic and proud to introduce the ‘VO’ line of men’s skin care products to the Latino community through this premier retailer,” stated Candace Chen, founder of FaceLube Automotive, the exclusive distributor of the FaceLube and VO.

The products are priced between $75 and $150. The three-step anti-aging system features a cleanser that also repels dirt, a non-oily treatment and an active skin protectant. The line also includes supplementary men’s skin care products like natural anti-aging sunscreen, all-natural beeswax lip balm, and a line of anti-aging shaving products with a pre-shave oil, shave cream, hand and neck cream, and shave rescue treatment.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon’s entry would shake up the most?
News

Fall Pixi collection to hit Target stores in August

BY Antoinette Alexander

MINNEAPOLIS — Beauty brand Pixi, developed by makeup artist Petra Strand, is focusing on the eyes this fall, as evidenced by its new product lineup slated to hit Target stores and Target.com in August.

New products for fall 2012 include:

Large Lash Mascara ($18): This mascara amplifies lashes with extreme volume and intense color. The oversized brush separates lashes, creating volume in a single sweep. Added vitamins E and B5, and bamboo extract work to nourish and condition for healthy, silky lashes.

Shade Quartette ($22 each): Four complementary shades in this eye shadow palette, allow for natural, sophisticated tone-on-tone application. Each palette provides foolproof eye enhancement without the need for blending. Vitamin E soothes eye area and mineral pigments help reflect the light. Available in shades of gold, shades of peach and shades of nude.

Natural Brow Duo ($18): This dual-ended tool helps to keep brows in perfect shape. On one end, the waterproof brow-powder pencil has an angled tip for precise application. The other end includes a tinted soft-hold gel infused with vitamin B5 to keep even the most unruly brows in place.

Lash Line Ink ($16): Designed to stay put for up to 12 hours, this nonfeathering, waterproof ink liner has a flexible precision tip that goes on smooth and dries quickly for a defined look that promises not to smudge or fade.

Waterproof Makeup Remover ($14): This makeup remover is a dual-phase formula to lifts away even the most stubborn waterproof and longwearing eye and lip formulas. Honey extract soothes and conditions, leaving skin refreshed and makeup-free.

Also coming out in August are new shades for blush (Rosy Rouge), lip and line (Peony Pretty, Bare Berry and Orchid Rose) and nail color (Evening Emerald, Classy Cocoa and Amazing Amethyst).

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon’s entry would shake up the most?
News

Enact PDUFA, but leave restrictions out of it

BY Jim Frederick

With overwhelming support in both the U.S. House and Senate and the strong backing of President Obama, a reauthorization of the landmark Prescription Drug User Fee Act that funds new drug application reviews at the Food and Drug Administration is a near certainty, probably within days or weeks at most. But one amendment to the Senate’s version of PDUFA reauthorization, contained in the Food and Drug Administration Safety Innovation Act, could threaten both retail pharmacies and the patients they serve.

That amendment, from Sen. Joe Manchin, D-W.Va., was slipped in as the Senate hammered out its final version of the Safety Innovation Act. It has nothing to do with the reauthorization of user fees, which are paid each year by drug manufacturers to help the FDA allay the staffing and operational costs of reviewing the hundreds of new drug applications it receives each year.

Instead, Manchin decided PDUFA would serve as a handy legislative vessel in which he could insert new and unnecessary restrictions on the sale of pain remedies commonly available in any pharmacy.

The Manchin proposal would make it tougher for patients to obtain common pain relief remedies containing hydrocodone — and tougher by far for pharmacies to offer them. How? By raising those pain relief meds from Schedule III to the more-restrictive Schedule II classification.

The nation’s top community pharmacy advocates haven’t let the amendment go unchallenged. Five pharmacy groups — the American Pharmacists Association, Food Marketing Institute, International Academy of Compounding Pharmacists, National Association of Chain Drug Stores and National Community Pharmacists Association — sent a letter in late May to every U.S. member of Congress and senator, warning that the new classification would "result in significant barriers for patients who have a legitimate need for these products and result in adding to the nation’s health care costs with no assurance of a reduction in diversion and abuse."

The restrictions would also make it impossible for doctors to phone prescriptions into pharmacies for those pain relievers, or even to electronically prescribe them in some states. What’s more, if enacted, the shift to Schedule II would boost dispensing costs to pharmacies, noted the organizations, "including significantly higher administrative costs, due to recordkeeping, inventory management and storage requirements."

If you agree, join NACDS and other groups in opposing the Manchin amendment. If not, please share your reasons why with us.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon’s entry would shake up the most?