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Duncan Hines, Wilton bake up new product for cake decorators

BY Ryan Chavis

PARSIPPANY, N.J. — Duncan Hines and Wilton are partnering to bring consumers the new Duncan Hines Wilton Decorator’s Choice Yellow Cake Mix to store shelves. The mix is optimized to ensure that the finished cake is smooth, cutting down on the issues of cracking and crumbing.

“Both Duncan Hines and Wilton are committed to listening to our consumers,” said Fran Hinckley, senior director of marketing at Duncan Hines. “When the opportunity arose to bring to market a cake mix that would make cake frosting and stacking easier, we immediately collaborated to develop this new product to help bakers.”

Duncan Hines and Wilton’s Decorator’s Choice Yellow Cake Mix is now available at retailers nationwide for a suggested retail price of $2.99.

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Progresso adds new soups to lineup

BY Ryan Chavis

MINNEAPOLIS — Progresso Soup, a brand from General Mills, will bring six new varieties that will suit a wide range of taste preferences, according to the company. The new additions brings Progresso's number of ready-to-eat soup selections to 90 flavors.

The new soups joining the lineup are: Tuscan-Style White Bean, Southwestern-Style Corn with Potatoes & Peppers, Progresso Light Creamy Chicken Alfredo with Pasta, Light Savory Beef Barley Vegetable, Traditional Creamy Roasted Chicken with Herb Dumplings and Creamy Tomato with Bacon and Cheese.

"Many Progresso consumers are seeking exciting new flavor options, but also are looking to manage their weight. They don't want to sacrifice great flavor while watching their calories," said Jill Haspert, associate marketing manager for Progresso Soup. "Progresso offers 40 soups with 100 calories or less per serving that are great ways to manage calories while still enjoying the creamy, savory flavors our consumers are craving."

All Progresso soups are available in the soup aisle and come with a suggested retail price of $2.39 for Vegetable Classics and $2.69 for Light and Traditional varieties.

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Study: Not getting enough vitamin D may double the risk of developing dementia and Alzheimer’s disease

BY Michael Johnsen

MINNEAPOLIS — In the largest study of its kind, researchers last week suggested that in older people, not getting enough vitamin D may double the risk of developing dementia and Alzheimer's disease. The study is published in the Aug. 6, 2014, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.
 
The study looked at blood levels of vitamin D, which includes vitamin D from food, supplements and sun exposure. 
 
"We expected to find an association between low Vitamin D levels and the risk of dementia and Alzheimer's disease, but the results were surprising — we actually found that the association was twice as strong as we anticipated," stated study author David Llewellyn of the University of Exeter Medical School in the United Kingdom.
 
For the study, 1,658 people over the age of 65 who were dementia-free had their vitamin D blood levels tested. After an average of six years, 171 participants developed dementia and 102 had Alzheimer's disease.
 
The study found that people with low levels of vitamin D had a 53% increased risk of developing dementia and those who were severely deficient had a 125% increased risk compared to participants with normal levels of vitamin D.
 
People with lower levels of vitamin D were nearly 70% more likely to develop Alzheimer's disease and those who had severe deficiency were over 120% more likely to develop the disease.
 
The results remained the same after researchers adjusted for other factors that could affect risk of dementia, such as education, smoking and alcohol consumption.
 
"Clinical trials are now needed to establish whether eating foods such as oily fish or taking vitamin D supplements can delay or even prevent the onset of Alzheimer's disease and dementia. We need to be cautious at this early stage and our latest results do not demonstrate that low vitamin D levels cause dementia. That said, our findings are very encouraging, and even if a small number of people could benefit, this would have enormous public health implications given the devastating and costly nature of dementia," said Llewellyn.
 
"It is exciting that this study’s findings supported the hypothesis that vitamin D ‘may be neuroprotective;’ however, it is important to continue investigating this association, and manage expectations for vitamin D’s isolated role in preventing complicated diseases, such as dementia and Alzheimer’s disease," commented Andrea Wong, VP scientific and regulatory affairs for the Council for Responsbile Nutrition

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