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Duchenne muscular dystrophy group launches app

BY Alaric DeArment

HACKENSACK, N.J. — An organization focused on a fatal genetic disorder that affects men has launched a mobile app that allows for the location of clinical trials and clinics.

Parent Project Muscular Dystrophy announced the launch of the Duchenne Central mobile app for Apple and Android devices, which it developed with Siren Interactive. Duchenne muscular dystrophy slowly robs young men of their muscle strength; there is currently no Food and Drug Administration-approved treatment for it, but there are treatments undergoing clinical trials. Duchenne is the most common fatal genetic disorder diagnosed in childhood, with about 20,000 new cases diagnosed annually and most patients living into their late 20s, according to PPMD.

"It is essential that patients and their families have ongoing access to information on the latest clinical trials," PPMD president and CEO Pat Furlong said. "We are proud to bring this new resource to the Duchenne community."

 

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Report: CVS/pharmacy enters Wichita market

BY Antoinette Alexander

WOONSOCKET, R.I. — CVS/pharmacy has reportedly entered the Wichita, Kansas, market with the opening Sunday of its first of several store locations in the market, according to a local news report.

The retailer has two additional locations slated to open in the area in July, the Wichita Eagle reported and quoted CVS/pharmacy spokesman Mike DeAngelis as saying that other locations are “in the pipeline.”

“Wichita was one of the few remaining … top 100 drug store markets where we didn’t have a presence,” DeAngelis was quoted as saying in the article.

To read the entire article click here.

 

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Study: The message matters in successful smoking cessation ads

BY Michael Johnsen

PHILADELPHIA — Researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania last week reported that an area of the brain that initiates behavioral changes had greater activation in smokers who watched anti-smoking ads with strong arguments versus those with weaker ones, and irrespective of such flashy elements as bright and rapidly changing scenes, loud sounds and unexpected scenario twists. 

“We investigated the two major dimensions of any piece of media, content and format, which are both important here,” said Daniel Langleben, a psychiatrist in the Center for Studies of Addiction at Penn Medicine. “If you give someone an unconvincing ad, it doesn’t matter what format you do on top of that. You can make it sensational. But in terms of effectiveness, content is more important. You’re better off adding in more sophisticated editing and other special effects only if it is persuasive.”

Even ads riddled with attention-grabbing tactics, the research suggests, are not effective at reducing tobacco intake unless their arguments are strong. However, ads with flashy editing and strong arguments, for example, produced better recognition.

“This sets the stage for science-based evaluation and design of persuasive public health advertising,” Langleben said. “An ad is only as strong as its central argument, which matters more than its audiovisual presentation. Future work should consider supplementing focus groups with more technology-heavy assessments, such as brain responses to these ads, in advance of even putting the ad together in its entirety.”

This is the first time research has shown an association between cognition and brain activity in response to content and format in televised ads and behavior, the researchers noted.

Those smokers also had significantly less nicotine metabolites in their urine when tested a month after viewing those ads, the team reported in a new study published online April 23 in the Journal of Neuroscience.

 

 

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