PHARMACY

Diabetics cite fatigue as daily challenge

BY Michael Johnsen

BOCA RATON, Fla. — As many as 85% of people with diabetes identified fatigue as one of their leading daily challenges, according to a recent survey of 8,000 diabetics commissioned by Diabetica Research Solutions.

Only 6% of survey respondents noted, however, that they use energy drinks.

“Chronic fatigue may be symptomatic of [diabetes] and can make it difficult for someone with diabetes to be active enough to control weight and properly self-manage their disease,” stated Richard Corlin, chairman of Diabetica’s diabetes advisory board. "People with poorly controlled diabetes are often dehydrated and vitamin-B-depleted. These can be significant factors causing fatigue."

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Patrick Murray joins BD Diagnostics

BY Allison Cerra

SPARKS, Md. — A global medical technology company has appointed a worldwide director of scientific affairs for its diagnostic systems division.

Becton, Dickinson and Co. said that Patrick Murray has joined its BD Diagnostics segment. In his new role, Murray "will leverage his clinical expertise to best define new product requirements, evaluate new technologies and engage external experts and institutions in BD’s innovation process," the company said.

Prior to joining BD, Murray served as chief of the microbiology service and senior scientist at the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center.

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Study finds that low body fat may not reduce risk of diabetes, heart disease

BY Alaric DeArment

BOSTON — People with lower percentages of body fat are not necessarily at lower risk for diabetes and heart disease, according to a new international study.

The study identified a gene that is linked with having less body fat but also with having an increased risk of Type 2 diabetes and heart disease. The investigators examined the genomes of more than 75,000 people and found that the gene, IRS1, was linked to less body fat, but also to unhealthy levels of cholesterol and blood glucose.

“We’ve uncovered a truly fascinating genetic story. … When we found the effect of this gene, we were very intrigued by the unexpected finding,” said study researcher Douglas Kiel, a professor at the Harvard Medical School and researcher at the Institute for Aging Research at HMS affiliate Hebrew SeniorLife. “People, particularly men, with a specific form of the gene are both more likely to have lower percent body fat [and] to develop heart disease and Type 2 diabetes. In simple terms, it is not only overweight individuals who can be predisposed for these metabolic diseases.”

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