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Dexas boosts kitchen products portfolio

BY Allison Cerra

COPPELL, Texas — Dexas has introduced two new kitchen products: a new melon slicer and watermelon cutting and serving board.

Dexas said its new watermelon cutting and serving board features a nonslip, raised edge that performs two functions: it holds the cutting board firmly and safely in place on the counter while also acting as a raised barrier to keep juice and seeds on the board. The item, which also is available in eggplant, lemon, tomato, green apple and orange shapes, also touts a propylene surface and is dishwasher safe.

Meanwhile, the Dexas melon slicer is an 11-in. serrated knife that easily slices through watermelon, cantaloupe and honeydew melons. The slicer’s red blade is made of high carbon stainless steel, while the handle is made of soft-grip TPE and has embossed pressure points for the fingers and thumb to provide precise control. What’s more, the slicer comes with a protective sheath that protects both the hands and the knife during storage.

For more information about these products, visit Dexas.com.

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Survey finds consumers less inclined to spend more on eco-friendly products, services

BY Allison Cerra

AUSTIN — While 46% of consumers are more inclined to purchase a product if it is eco-friendly, nearly 60% are unwilling to pay more money for that eco-friendly product or service, according to new research.

RetailMeNot.com said its latest Shoppers Trend Report, which included data from a survey jointly conducted with Ipsos Public Affairs, found that 71% of respondents surveyed felt they were aware of the positive and/or adverse environmental impact of products they purchase every day; however, more than 4-in-10 respondents (43%) reported that when they actually make purchases, they do not think about the impact that those products have on the environment. Additionally, 40% of respondents said they buy green, eco-friendly products when they are readily available and there is no big cost difference (versus non-eco-friendly equivalents), although a majority of respondents (51%) report that they buy whichever products suit their needs at the time.

When it came to whether or not retailers’ support of environmental charities influenced purchased, the RetailMeNot-Ipsos survey found a mere 15% of respondents said support for such causes would lead them to be more likely to shop at a retailer, while 39% of respondents said "maybe" and 24% said "no." Additionally, 24% said that they don’t care about what charities or causes a business supports, therefore the factor would not impact where they shop.

The age, ethnicity and gender of these consumers also played a role, the survey found: respondents ages 18 to 34 years were more swayed by "green" cause marketing (23% versus 11% of those ages 35 to 54 years); while non-white respondents were more likely to say they would be persuaded to buy based on retailer support for a "green" charity (24% versus 14% of white respondents). RetailMeNot-Ipsos also noted that women were more likely than men (45% versus 36%) to buy green products if it is convenient and the price point is right. Other green purchasing leaders include college graduates (55%), Northeasterners (54%), adults under 35 years old (53%) and households with children (50%), which all said they are more inclined to buy environmentally-friendly products and to pay more for them.

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Healthcare organizations lag in social media activity, study finds

BY Alaric DeArment

NEW YORK — Social media open many new opportunities for healthcare organizations to engage consumers and are changing the nature of healthcare interaction, according to a new report by PwC’s Health Research Institute.

The report, "Social media likes healthcare: From marketing to social business," called social media activity by hospitals, health insurers and drug companies "minuscule" and found that while 8-in-10 healthcare companies had a social media presence, health-related community sites had 24 times more social media activity than corporate sites, noting that the finding held significant implications for businesses looking to capitalize on social media opportunities.

"Health organizations have an opportunity to use social media as a way to better listen, participate in discussions and engage with consumers in ways that extend their interaction beyond a clinical encounter," PwC U.S. health industries leader Kelly Barnes said. "Savvy adopters are viewing social media as a business strategy, not just a marketing tool."

In addition, the study found that one-third of consumers use social media sites for seeking medical information, tracking and sharing symptoms, and sharing their thoughts about doctors, treatments and health plans. Meanwhile, between 20% and 40% had used social media to find health-related consumer reviews and information about other patients’ experiences, or had posted information about their experiences or joined a health forum or community. Forty-five percent said information found through social media would affect their decision to get a second opinion, while 41% said it would affect their choice of a specific doctor or treatment center; 34% said it would affect their decision about taking a certain medication, and 32% said it would affect their choice of a health insurance plan. Overall, more than 80% of consumers between 18 and 24 years said they were likely to share health information through social media channels, while 90% said they would trust information found there, compared with 45% of those between 45 and 64 years who said they would share health information.

The report includes data from a recent Health Research Institute social media survey of more than 1,000 consumers in the United States; 124 members of the eHealth Initiative, a health information and technology organization comprising various industry organizations; interviews with more than 30 industry executives; and a survey of the social media activity of several hospitals, insurers, drug companies and patient communities.


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