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Decision Resources: Crohn’s disease drug market will increase 31% by 2019

BY Allison Cerra

BURLINGTON, Mass. The drug market for Crohn’s disease treatments will see moderate growth over the next decade, Decision Resources reported Wednesday.

The research firm projected that the market will increase a little more than 31%, from $3.2 billion in 2009 to $4.2 billion in 2019, in the United States, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, the United Kingdom and Japan. Decision Resources said the the modest growth rate masks such market changes as new and emerging biologics, as well as generic competition.

According to a report by Pharmacor — an advisory service that offers clients in the biopharmaceutical industry the most up-to-date information available on commercially significant disease topics — such Crohn’s disease treatments as Remicade, made by Centocor Ortho Biotech, Merck and Mitsubishi Tanabe, and Abbott and Eisai’s Humira dominated the Crohn’s disease market in 2009, capturing slightly more than three-quarters of major-market sales. The drugs are classified as biologic agents known as tumor necrosis factor-alpha inhibitors. Meanwhile, Biogen Idec and Elan’s Tysabri (a cell adhesion molecule inhibitor) and TNF-alpha inhibitor Cimzia, made by UCB and Otsuka, had a negligible impact on the Crohn’s disease market, Pharmacor said.

"In 2009, sales of maintenance therapies for Crohn’s disease greatly exceeded sales of acute therapies," said Decision Resources analyst Kathryn Benton. "We expect growth in the market will be largely attributable to increasing sales of maintenance therapies and that sales of acute therapies will remain essentially flat through 2019. However, no current therapy is completely effective in maintaining remission of Crohn’s disease, and as a result, significant opportunity remains for more-effective emerging therapies in the maintenance space."

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Shoppers Food & Pharmacy president to retire

BY Allison Cerra

LANHAM, Md. A regional supermarket owned by Supervalu said its president will retire Oct. 1.

Shoppers Food & Pharmacy said Monday that its president Dick Bergman will retire after holding his position for four years. He will be replaced by Brian Huff, SVP specialty retail, who will resume Bergman’s responsibilities until a successor is named.

“I appreciate the years of service Dick has provided Shoppers and wish him the best as he begins this new chapter in his life,” Huff was reported as saying. “Dick has achieved many key successes during his tenure. By building on these accomplishments, we look forward to the continued success of Shoppers.”

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Fraud losses decline among retail merchants but still remain high

BY Antoinette Alexander

NEW YORK Retail merchants incurred more than $139 billion fraud losses during the past year, according to a new study released by LexisNexis Risk Solutions. While fraud stands at a more than $100 billion problem for retail, fraud losses did decline 25%, compared with 2009.

“While the total cost of fraud has gone down since last year, retailers still lose more than $3 for every $1 lost due to a fraudulent transaction, and online or mobile fraud is a growing threat,” stated Jim Rice, director of market planning for retail and e-commerce markets for LexisNexis Risk Solutions.

The reduction in fraud losses may be attributed to a gradual improvement in economic conditions, greater awareness of fraud threats and increased success of effective fraud prevention solutions.

The second annual “LexisNexis True Cost of Fraud Study,” conducted by Javelin Strategy & Research, examines how U.S. retail fraud affects merchants, financial institutions and consumers. The study was conducted by surveying a retail merchant panel comprised of 1,006 risk and fraud decision-makers and influencers. The study also draws on identity fraud victim data from a phone survey of more than 5,000 U.S. adults, including 828 fraud victims.

For every $100 in fraudulent transactions, retailers incurred a “true” cost of $310 in total losses, including costs associated with replacing lost or stolen merchandise. In addition, the study found that consumer victims of retail fraud incurred $5.5 billion in costs stemming from un-reimbursed losses, legal fees and other factors.

The study also found that merchants who accept mobile payments saw the highest volume of fraudulent transactions; meanwhile, nearly 4-in-10 merchants plan to accept mobile charges in the next 12 months.

Merchants with more than $50 million in annual revenue experienced more than double the average annual fraud loss of their smaller counterparts.

Furthermore, friendly fraud accounted for one-fifth of fraud affecting merchants. Friendly fraud is the term used to describe a fraud that occurs when a consumer buys an item online, receives it but claims they did not, and requests a refund or chargeback from the merchant or delivery of a duplicate item.

As for consumers, more than 1-in-3 consumers who were victims of fraud will avoid certain merchants, 1-in-4 reported they will spend less money and nearly 1-in-3 victims will switch payment methods.

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