HEALTH

Dannon gives presentation on probiotics to geriatric organization

BY Michael Johnsen

WASHINGTON Dannon on Thursday reported that its presentation of the potential for probiotics in geriatric health and disease was presented to annual-meeting attendees of the The American Geriatrics Society, noting that probiotics can play positive roles in immune function, intestinal disorders, inflammation and cancer in older adults.

At the symposium, delivered Wednesday evening, John Morley of Saint Louis University School of Medicine led a panel of speakers concerning the benefits from specific “friendly” bacteria in older adults and their use in clinical applications.

There will be approximately 2 billion people over the age of 60 by 2050, noted Simin Meydani, associate director of the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center at Tufts University. As we age, there is impairment of all of the different arms of immune function, he said, with the most significant problem that older people face being a higher incidence of morbidity or mortality from infectious diseases because they are lacking a proper immune function.

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Web-based association regulates weight-loss claims

BY Michael Johnsen

NEW YORK One week after a number of weight-loss advocacy groups and GlaxoSmithKline petitioned the Food and Drug Administration to closely regulate weight loss claims, an Internet industry association noted that it’s already reining in what it considers to be outlandish advertising claims through a self-regulation program of online advertising.

The Electronic Retailing Association created the self-regulation tool, the Electronic Retailing Self-Regulation Program, which is administered by the Council of Better Business Bureaus and overseen by the National Advertising Review Council.

The ERSP on Monday determined that Proactol, marketer of the Proactol Fat Binder, has provided a reasonable basis for certain advertising claims and announced that the company has agreed to modify other claims.

ERSP reviewed advertising claims in Internet advertising, in videos posted to the YouTube video-sharing Website, and on a MySpace Website page for the product. Claims at issue included: “Helps Decrease Your Appetite;” “Proactol has been clinically tested to bind up to 28 percent of dietary fats;” and “Medically Backed Weight Loss.”

ERSP determined that the marketer provided a reasonable basis for its general performance claims that Proactol “helps reduce” calorie intake, excess body weight, food cravings and appetite, but recommended that any representations regarding weight loss be properly qualified by indicating that the product should be used in conjunction with a low-calorie diet and a routine exercise regimen.

Proactol informed ERSP that it has removed claims from the US version of its Website and product labeling stating that the product is “clinically proven” in favor of the modified claim “clinically tested.” Further, the marketer asserted it has removed from its U.S. Website the claim that it is a “certified organic medical device.”

Following its review of the evidence, ERSP determined the marketer provided a reasonable basis that the product’s active ingredient—a fiber complex—has been “clinically tested.” However, ERSP recommended the marketer discontinue use of the claim in instances where it makes specific, quantified reference to the product’s effectiveness, to avoid suggesting to consumers that the product is “clinically proven” to effect dietary fat intake.

ERSP also determined that the statements of the two doctors read in conjunction with the general comments about the clinical testing conducted on Proactol provided a reasonable basis for the claim that the product is “medically backed.”

Further, ERSP confirmed that the claim that Proactol “Is a certified organic medical device” no longer appears on the U.S. version of the Proactol Website.

In its decision, ERSP noted that it has been advised that the marketer has had videos containing inaccurate claims removed from the Internet. ERSP has alerted the marketer to other third-party advertisements containing unsupported and/or inaccurate claims and requested the marketer use its best efforts to address these advertisements as well.

The company, in its marketer’s statement, said “Proactol has fully supported the ERSP self regulatory program’s inquiry and has appreciated the professionalism shown throughout this investigation” and “Proactol Ltd will ardently try to adhere to the comments and suggestions made within this inquiry.”

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CRN opposes petition to FDA on weight-loss claims

BY Michael Johnsen

WASHINGTON The Council for Responsible Nutrition stands opposed to the joint citizens petition filed April 17 by the American Dietetic Association, the Obesity Society, Shaping America’s Health and GlaxoSmithKline Consumer Healthcare, which asks the Food and Drug Administration to treat weight-loss claims for dietary supplements as disease claims, the association stated Monday.

“CRN plans to oppose this petition to re-classify weight loss claims as either disease claims or health claims requiring FDA approval,” stated Steve Mister, president and chief executive officer of CRN. “We believe weight loss claims are legitimate and appropriate claims for products in the dietary supplement category, provided these products have substantiation to support the truthfulness of these claims. FDA has made it clear that it considers weight loss claims appropriate and permissible under the Dietary Supplement Health & Education Act—meaning that manufacturers should not have to seek the Agency’s approval before making these claims. Therefore, CRN intends to vigorously defend the industry’s rights in this area.”

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