HEALTH

CRN opens international headquarters

BY Michael Johnsen

WASHINGTON The Council for Responsible Nutrition on Tuesday announced the opening of its international headquarters in Manno, Switzerland. CRN will be opening a new wholly-owned entity to be known as the Council for Responsible Nutrition-International (CRN-I), the dietary supplement industry association announced.

“This was a natural progression for CRN to formalize the work it’s been doing for decades by standing up for science-based principles for dietary/food supplements worldwide,” stated Mark LeDoux, CRN. “CRN-I will provide a new forum by which we can strengthen our current efforts, with a particular emphasis on promoting sound nutrition and food safety policies, and encouraging government bodies, regulators and other decision makers to make policy recommendations that are well-grounded in science. In this global economy, having a European-based platform from which to disseminate science-based policy recommendations has been imperative to maximize our influence on behalf of our multi-national members doing business around the world.”

The new organization announced its immediate first priority is to conduct a one-day scientific symposium –“Scientific Issues Related to Codex Goals” — taking place July 3 in Geneva, Switzerland, in tandem with the Codex Alimentarius Commission meeting. The CRN-I conference will include invited international regulators and policy makers, nutrition scientists and academics, to share perspectives on Codex-related issues relating to risk management and scientific standards for health claims.

“We have a responsibility to our members and to our consumers worldwide to ensure that regulators and policy makers have the opportunity to engage in intellectual, peer-reviewed, science-based discussions so that they can consider these viewpoints as part of their policy-making process,” LeDoux said.

The CRN-I Board will be announced at the first CRN-I annual meeting, scheduled for April 15 in Paris in conjunction with the meeting of the Codex Committee on General Principles.

For more information, visit www.crn-i.ch.

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Shaking up protein times 6

BY DSN STAFF

ORLANDO, Fla. —BSN last month showcased its line of ready-to-drink protein supplements at the ECRM Vitamin, Diet & Sports Nutrition meeting here. The company’s RTD protein supplements already are best-sellers at specialty shop GNC and military retailer AAFES.

The new-to-mass RTD protein shake, called Syntha-6, features six proteins—including milk, whey and soy—that each are metabolized by the body at different rates, allowing for a more gradual supplementation of protein.

Sports enthusiasts and avid dieters may be credited with driving sales of protein supplements higher last year by some 22%; for the 52 weeks ended Dec. 26, 2009, sales of protein supplements reached $148.3 million across food, drug and mass (including Walmart), according to Nielsen Group data.

For 2010, BSN is planning $3.2 million in advertising.

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‘Life…supplemented’ hopes to make consumers wiser about health

BY Antoinette Alexander

WASHINGTON Nearly half of Americans want to be healthier and have good intentions, but just don’t know where to start, according to a recent study by the “Life…supplemented” consumer wellness initiative.

In honor of National Wise Consumer Health Month, started by the American Institute for Preventive Medicine, two licensed naturopathic doctors, who specialize in an integrative and total body approach to health and nutrition — Douglas MacKay, N.D., VP, scientific and regulatory affairs, Council for Responsible Nutrition, and Mitchell Stargrove, N.D., L.Ac, practicing naturopathic doctor and author of “Herb, Nutrient and Drug Interactions: Clinical Implications and Therapeutic Strategies” and editor of InteractionsGuide.com — have teamed up to try and help Americans become more educated health consumers.

“As a former practicing licensed naturopathic doctor, I have always found that an educated individual is a healthier individual,” stated MacKay. “I believe it is part of a physician’s role to educate and encourage the patient to take responsibility for his or her health. After all, it’s the patient, not the doctor, who ultimately creates and accomplishes change and healing in the patient’s lifestyle. This partnership is all about empowering individuals to become more educated about their health. By educating yourself on how various factors, including lifestyle status, age, gender, family history, etc., impact your health, you can take preventative steps to be healthier throughout your life.”

For example, individuals may need to think about are drug-induced nutrient depletions, which are nutrient depletions that are caused by prescription drugs. According to National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data from 2003 to 2006, 47% of all Americans reported using a prescription drug in the past month and some may not have realized that some of these drugs can cause essential nutrients to be depleted.

“It is widely known that statin medications, often prescribed for high-cholesterol levels, deplete Coenzyme Q10 from the body, which helps transform energy into activity,” stated Stargrove. “Healthcare professionals should discuss these potential depletions with their patients and discuss how patients can avoid these depletions so that they can be as healthy as possible. Our book helps educate healthcare professionals so that they can take this information back to their patients.”

The 2009 “Life…supplemented” My Wellness Scorecard National Study was conducted Oct. 2 through Oct. 9, 2009 by Ipsos Public Affairs. The survey was conducted on-line and included a national sample of 1,172 adults ages 18 years and older from Ipsos’ U.S. online panel.

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