PHARMACY

Credit Suisse bullish on supermarket pharmacy

BY Michael Johnsen

NEW YORK — This year’s upcoming $29 billion wave of margin-friendly generic pharmaceuticals will be as big a growth catalyst for supermarket pharmacies as it will be for their pureplay drug store cousins, Credit Suisse research analyst Ed Kelly stated in a note published Thursday.

Conservative projection models place the generic impact at 3% to 5% accretive to 2012 earnings, he reported, given that the channel fills between 10% and 15% of all retail prescriptions.

“While it’s unclear if the benefit will flow to the bottom line, we note that it at least provides some operating cushion to this structurally challenged industry,” Kelly wrote. “We remain somewhat cautious on the group, although we continue to believe that investors can make money selectively trading the stocks.” Credit Suisse recommends Kroger but not Safeway or Supervalu.

At the crest of the generic wave will be Lipitor, a $7.5 billion blockbuster that should face generic atorvastatin competiton on Nov. 30. That quickly will be followed by Lexapro (escitalopram, $2.8 billion), Seroquel (quetiapine, $4.1 billion), Plavix (clopidogrel, $5.6 billion) and Singulair (montelukast, $3.7 billion).

“While the number of generic launches ease after 2012, the following few years should still be good by historical standards,” Kelly wrote. “We project that $18 billion and $14 billion in branded sales will convert to generic in 2013 and 2014, respectively.”

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

PHARMACY

Court: Watson’s generic OTC decongestant does not infringe on branded versions

BY Alaric DeArment

MORRISTOWN, N.J. — Over-the-counter generic versions of a line of products used to treat congestion do not infringe on the patents covering the branded versions, a federal court ruled Wednesday.

Watson Pharmaceuticals said the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Florida ruled that its versions of Reckitt Benckiser’s Mucinex (guaifenesin), Mucinex D (guaifenesin and dextromethorphan-hydrobromide) and Mucinex DM (guaifenesin and pseudoephedrine) do not infringe U.S. Patent No. 6,372,252. Watson still is seeking Food and Drug Administration approval for its version.

Mucinex is used to loosen phlegm and clear the bronchial passageways. The product line had sales of about $500 million in 2010, according to IMS Health and SymphonyIRI.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

PHARMACY

Take Care offers discounted sports, camp physicals

BY Michael Johnsen

CONSHOHOCKEN, Pa. — Take Care Health Systems announced Thursday that through April 30, the retail clinic operator will be offering sports and camp physicals for $35. The physicals, regularly $60, are administered by board-certified nurse practitioners and physician assistants at select Walgreens locations.

"Sports and camp physicals are a great opportunity for families to interact with a trusted healthcare professional who can identify children who might be at risk for illness or injury during certain activities," stated Sandra Ryan, chief nurse practitioner officer for Take Care Health Systems. "During the examination, Take Care Clinics’ nurse practitioners and physician assistants screen patients for specified healthcare conditions, check whether immunizations are up-to-date and answer any questions parents may have regarding their child’s development," Ryan added.

Take Care Clinic nurse practitioners and physician assistants also can administer appropriate immunizations — such as flu, Tdap (tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis), Menactra (meningitis), Varicella (chickenpox), MMR (measles, mumps and rubella) and Gardasil (human papillomavirus) — for school-aged children.

High-school and middle-school level preparticipation sports physicals are not available at Take Care Clinics in Kansas, however.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES