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Creating paths for women’s career advancement

BY Rob Eder

Jody Pinson of Wal-Mart Stores, Judi Kletz of Procter & Gamble, Sabrina Wiewel of Hallmark, and Nancy Krawczyk of the Network of Executive Women, pictured above, participated in a panel on Monday about the challenges women face in leadership positions.

BOSTON — A panel of female executives met Monday morning to examine the many challenges women continue to face reaching leadership positions, and how their own companies were addressing those challenges and adapting their cultures to create new pathways for advancement for women executives.

Moderator Nancy Krawczyk, VP sales and marketing for the Network of Executive Women set the table with a quick review of the network’s new report, “Women 2020: The future of women’s leadership in retail and consumer goods.”

One area the report addressed is the issue of the “motherhood penalty.” “Working moms start at lower salaries, are promoted less frequently and are often passed over for new assignments because assumptions are made … that they’re too busy,” Krawczyk said. 

Joining Krawczyk on the panel were Jody Pinson, VP beauty merchandising for Wal-Mart Stores; Judi Kletz, associate director of industry reputation and influence/North American customer business development for Procter & Gamble; and Sabrina Wiewel, VP/GM national chain drug for Hallmark.

Kletz discussed how P&G is using its brands to educate the public and leveraging social media to help tackle such deep-rooted and often unconscious biases about women as being viewed as either “too nice” or “too bossy.”

One example Kletz noted was the YouTube campaign “Always #LikeAGirl,” which has received more than 47 million views. 

Wiewel, who also is Asian-American, discussed the “double-double bind” that faces multicultural women in business and the steps Hallmark had taken to create paths for advancement. More than 10% of Hallmark’s mid-level managers and 10% of its senior leadership are multicultural and female.

Pinson talked about the many steps Walmart had taken under former CEO Mike Duke to help empower women in leadership roles, including the company’s $20 billion commitment to helping advance women-owned businesses.

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Implementing in-store nutrition programs

BY DSN STAFF

Brad Dayton of Ahold USA, pictured above, discussed Ahold’s nutrition program at an Insight Session on Monday.

BOSTON — Pharmacy and nutrition. These two areas of health have always gone hand-in-hand, but community pharmacy is taking a closer look at ways to merge nutrition interventions and diet counseling into their practice — and the results are proving to be successful.

Looking to help industry players explore strategies and methods to successfully merge nutrition counseling into pharmacy, Kim Kirchherr, director of health and wellness at the National Dairy Council, and Brad Dayton, senior director of pharmacy at Ahold USA, presented Monday’s Insight Session “Advancing Neighborhood Care — Patient Nutrition Programs.”

“What’s the opportunity? As a dietitian having worked in a mainstream grocery store, I love it when you can find a win-win. … Dairy, fruits and vegetables have a lot of nutrients in them that can help reduce or help manage chronic disease, so that’s the opportunity,” Kirchherr said. “… The end result is that you are trying to meet a need for that consumer and their health goals, but at the same time, you are selling perishable items.”

When looking to implement such programs, Kirchherr shared some points to consider, including:

  • What health and wellness mean to your customers, employees and overall company;
  • What in-store real estate can be dedicated to health and wellness, such as private rooms;
  • Online provides a health-and-wellness presence 24/7; and 
  • What does success look like, and what are you trying to accomplish?

Bringing the topic to life, Dayton discussed Ahold USA’s nutrition program. 

“Pharmacists are asked questions about nutrition every day. … I believe there are two disease states that are at the intersection of food and pharmacy, and those are heart health and diabetes,” Dayton said. Ahold added its first in-store nutritionist in 2005 and plans to have more than 20 by 2015.

With the help of its nutritionists, the grocer has implemented several programs, including Healthy Ideas and gluten-free on-shelf labeling programs.

The company also has, through its Diabetes Care Pharmacist program that was implemented about two years ago, nearly 140 diabetic care pharmacists who are specially trained in diabetes.

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HIT expands pharmacy’s role in health care

BY Michael Johnsen

Steve Friedman of PDX-NHIN-Rx.com, Christopher Thomsen of Kirby Lester and David Yakimischak of Surescripts, pictured above, discuss the future of pharmacy HIT at an Insight Session on Monday.

BOSTON — Pharmacy health information technology has come a long way in the past five years, but there is still a significant amount of opportunity for pharmacy operations to plug into the HIT network — opportunities that will augment pharmacy’s value to the healthcare system in improving adherence and reducing abandonment. And as pharmacy evolves into more of a service industry, pharmacy’s interconnectivity with other healthcare stakeholders will become critical. 

Christoper Thomsen, VP business development at Kirby Lester; Steve Friedman, VP pharmaceutical trade relations at PDX-NHIN-Rx.com; and David Yakimischak, general manager of medication network services at Surescripts joined together as part of the Insight Session titled “The Missing Connection: Pharmacy HIT Update” on Monday morning.

HIT is becoming a crucial element in pharmacy, Friedman said, particularly in generic utilization, specialty medicines, medication adherence, MTM, Part D Star ratings, network access, regulatory issues and global partnerships. In order to be competitive today, a pharmacy has to have an advanced technology platform that’s scalable and geographically dispersed, as well as has a mobile, clinical exchange as a patient-focused IT platform, he said. 

There is already significant traction in such areas as e-prescribing. In the next five years, about 80% to 90% of the prescriptions in the country will be routed through electronic prescribing, Yakimischak said, from a base of more than half of prescriptions in the country last year. 

“HIT is one of the key issues affecting the expanding role of pharmacy,” Thomsen said. “We’ve done an excellent job in terms of pharmacy with technologies in 20 years,” he added, especially for the first 20 ft. where the order is entered, filled and picked up. “We need to start paying attention now to the last 10 ft., after we’ve prepared the prescription and got all of that information, how do we get that to the patient effectively?” Thomsen asked. The focus should be on capturing the relevant health information that comes through the pharmacy so that the pharmacist can share it in a meaningful and useful way with the patient, Thomsen said. 

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