PHARMACY

Counterfeit drugs, digital technology emerge as major issues influencing health care in 2014

BY Alaric DeArment

NEW YORK — While the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act will undoubtedly reshape the U.S. healthcare industry for years to come, it is only one of many factors that will emerge next year, according to a new report released Wednesday.

The report, Top Health Industry Issues for 2014, by PwC’s Health Research Institute, was based on a survey of 1,000 consumers and interviews with health industry leaders.

According to the report, the 10 issues that stand out as the top focus for the industry are:

  • Price transparency is growing as purchasers – consumers and employers – are demanding and receiving more information on cost and quality
  • Employers are exploring new health insurance options through private exchanges
  • New regulation aims to eliminate counterfeit medications in the drug supply chain
  • States are turning to managed care to help contain Medicaid long-term care costs
  • All healthcare companies need to rethink their roles and business models in the new health economy
  • Healthcare companies will need to change their rules on innovation — embrace “fail fast” approaches
  • Social, mobile, analytics, and cloud technologies are driving new health industry business models
  • Corporate venture capital is picking up the slack as traditional venture funding slows for pharmaceutical start-ups
  • Technology is redefining the healthcare job market
  • Drugmakers must rethink their clinical trial research methods, embracing alternative approaches

“While health insurance exchange implementation is driving headlines today – in reality the next 12 months will be marked by how well the industry addresses a range of core business challenges," PwC U.S. health industries leader Kelly Barnes said. "Our annual Top Issues report identifies the main concerns facing the health industry in 2014. Businesses must address rapid innovation and competition from non-traditional players, but above all they must respond to empowered consumers as customer-centric transformation sweeps healthcare.”

 

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McKesson Pharmacy Systems and Automation enables Rx delivery to patients anywhere

BY Michael Johnsen

PITTSBURGH — McKesson Pharmacy Systems and Automation on Wednesday introduced a new EnterpriseRx Flexible Delivery solution that expands the reach of outpatient and retail pharmacies beyond their local communities. The new solution can be seen at the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists Midyear Clinical Meeting, which runs Dec. 8 to12.

“EnterpriseRx Flexible Delivery solution matches the convenience of a mail order program without compromising the personal connection a patient has with their hometown pharmacist, or the pharmacist who took the time to explain their medication at the end of a hospital visit,” Nathan Mott, President MPS & A said. “Whether a patient’s home is 30 or 300 miles away, the pharmacist who has an established relationship with the patient can still provide personal care.”

MPS & A customers currently using EnterpriseRx Flexible Delivery range from outpatient pharmacies operating specialty prescription programs and large retail chains staying connected with snow birds, to small independent pharmacies serving patients in rural communities.

 

 

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Teva looks at effects of Copaxone patent loss

BY Alaric DeArment

JERUSALEM — Teva Pharmaceutical Industries anticipates that it could lose about $500 million in sales next year if a generic version of its multiple sclerosis drug hits the market, the Israeli drug maker said Tuesday.

In issuing its financial outlook for the 2014 calendar year, Teva said it expected sales of about $19.3 billion to $20.3 billion if at least two generic versions of Copaxone (glatiramer acetate) hit the U.S. market in June, or $19.8 billion to $20.8 billion if they don’t. Mylan and Momenta Pharmaceuticals are among the companies hoping to launch a generic version of the drug, but Teva said its sales would see a $78 million benefit for every month the launch of a generic version was delayed.

"2014 will be a pivotal year for Teva and a year of major transitions across the company," acting president and CEO Eyal Desheh said. "We will continue to make significant progress in implementing our strategy."

Generic drugs, from which Teva derives most of its revenue, are expected to have overall sales of $9.8 billion to$10.5 billion. Copaxone had sales of $3.6 billion in 2012, according to IMS Health.

 

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