BEAUTY CARE

Conair to kick off ‘hair-raising’ promotion

BY Antoinette Alexander

STAMFORD, Conn. During this year’s Fashion Week swimwear shows in Miami, Conair is helping fashionistas “beat the heat” by providing free transportation to the public in exchange for their taped “confessions of a bad hair day.”

On July 16 and 17, a fleet of Conair “Beat the Heat” party buses will provide free transportation to the public in exchange for their taped “confessions.” The filmed footage will be posted on a microsite, ConairBeautyPatrol.com, where viewers can vote for their favorite confession and participants have the chance to win a trip to 2011’s Miami Fashion Week Swim and a wardrobe of Conair’s latest styling tools.

The shuttles, which can transport 25 people at a time, will serve as an innovative and interactive mobile environment for passengers. The vehicles will be pumped with air conditioning to support a humidity-free hair day and passengers can receive complimentary Conair hair elastics to tame unruly tresses.

Stops will include Convention Center Drive, as well as other Fashion Week hotspots like Raleigh Hotel, W South Beach and Gansevoort South hotels.

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P&G recalls certain bottles of Scope mouthwash

BY Antoinette Alexander

CINCINNATI Procter & Gamble has voluntarily recalled some bottles of its Scope Original Mint and Peppermint mouthwash due to a possible malfunctioning child-resistant cap and lack of a required health hazard statement, the U.S. Consumer Products Safety Commission announced.

This recall involves some bottles of Scope Original Mint and Scope Peppermint mouthwash in 1-liter sizes. The recalled bottles have the number “4” on the bottom of the bottle. The bottles with the “4” on the bottom may not be child-resistant. Consumers also can attempt to twist the cap open and if the cap can be twisted off without squeezing the tabs on the cap, the package is not child-resistant.

According to the recall, the mouthwash contains ethyl alcohol and certain bottles have malfunctioning child-resistant caps and lack the statement, “This package for households without young children,” as required by the Poison Prevention Packaging Act. Ethyl alcohol is toxic and can cause serious injury or death if ingested by children. No injuries have been reported.

The mouthwash was sold at drug stores, grocery stores and other retailers nationwide and in Canada between January and June for about $4.

Consumers should keep this product out of the reach of children. Consumers who purchased the product with the expectation that it would be in child-resistant packaging can contact Procter & Gamble for a full refund or a replacement coupon. Adult consumers can continue to use the product as directed.

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Professional skin care market takes a hit, Kline reports

BY Antoinette Alexander

LITTLE FALLS, N.J. The recession has taken its toll on the professional skin care market, but that hasn’t stopped marketers from rolling out new products, many of which are designed to fight the signs of aging, according to a recent study by consulting and research firm Kline.

According to Kline’s “Professional Skin Care 2009 Global Series: Market Analysis and Opportunities” report, Europe and the United States posted “substantial declines,” with the exception to the trend coming from the BRIC markets spearheaded by Brazil, which posted growth of 11.1%.

“The recession’s impact in Europe and the United States resulted in a change in spending patterns, a decline in the frequency of visits to spas and physician’s offices, and a shift to lower-priced brands,” stated Karen Doskow, industry manager for Kline. “But even in the face of a gloomy economy, industry leaders fought back with a healthy flow of new product launches, many of which targeted the anti-aging segment.”

Doskow further explained that “products that were unique, multitasking or offering dual benefits certainly stood out for the recession-stricken consumer. Professional skin care marketers acknowledged the need to diversify, segment and innovate their offerings in order to cater to a change in demand for the products that are preventative or that are proven to help reverse signs of aging.”

The report found that anti-aging products accounted for 41.1% in the United States and nearly 50% of sales in Europe and Brazil. Product trends varied on a worldwide basis — skin whitening was a No. 1 concern for marketers in China and Japan, and anticellulite treatments were a top priority in Europe and Brazil.

The direct sales channel in the U.S. professional market posted a 10% increase, making it a top trend for the year. In this channel, marketers not only intensified their support of accounts with business-building tools, but they also took charge of building relationships directly with customers through podcasts, YouTube clips and member-only clubs. Incorporating social media outlets into their marketing strategy has become the standard practice in recent years, allowing marketers to reach out directly to the customer.

This, in turn, is quickly becoming a dominant way to reinforce brand imaging and promote new products.

Looking ahead, Kline predicted that the professional skin care market for the United States will grow by a CAGR of 5.6% through 2014, or if exceptional conditions prevail, the market could grow as high as 11.3% a year. Medical care providers, achieving the strongest growth rate, would boost sales.

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