PHARMACY

Community pharmacy members collaborate to take Medicaid issues to Washington

BY Adam Kraemer

ALEXANDRIA, Va. In a strong showing, more than 70 members of community pharmacy, including executive and pharmacy company representatives, visited with members of Congress Wednesday to advocate on behalf of community pharmacy.

The effort, a collaboration between the National Association of Chain Drug Stores, the Food Marketing Institute and the National Community Pharmacists Association, addressed a number of Medicaid access issues, including average manufacturer price and the impending implementation of tamper-proof prescription paper.

In July, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services issued a final rule on reimbursements that sent the pharmacy community reeling. The final regulations set a new upper limit on what the federal government will pay states in matching funds for generics dispensed to Medicaid patients. The regulations also redefine the price of those drugs, based on the AMP they command in the open market, as determined by CMS. The change to an AMP-based formula will cost pharmacies.

At the time, Steve Anderson, president and chief executive officer of NACDS, called it “simply unacceptable.” John Tilley, president of the NCPA, called it “a travesty.”

The policy is scheduled to take effect in January 2008, triggering $8 billion in cuts from Medicaid pharmacy reimbursement for generic drugs, requiring pharmacies to sell some drugs at a loss. If pharmacies have to absorb these deep cuts, it could force them to alter the way they care for not only Medicaid patients, but all their patients, NACDS claimed.

“Pharmacists, who are also constituents of Senate and House leaders, came to Capitol Hill this week to warn that America is on the precipice of a healthcare crisis if the disastrous Medicaid reimbursement rule isn’t fixed,” said Bruce Roberts, NCPA executive vice president and chief executive officer. “We need the House to pass H.R. 3140 and the Senate to pass S.1951, which both address the issue, so they can be reconciled and signed into law before the year ends.”

“Millions of Americans depend on supermarket pharmacies for medicines and dietary guidance that promote health and well-being,” said FMI President and CEO Tim Hammonds, noting that FMI members operate more than 19,000 pharmacies. “The government should not put community pharmacies in a position where inadequate reimbursements force them to choose between keeping their doors open or denying benefits to their Medicaid patients. We need immediate corrective action. Community pharmacies deliver needed medications to Medicaid beneficiaries for the government, and this critical program cannot survive without them.”

The other main topic on the agenda is what the organizations are claiming is the all-too-soon implementation of tamper-proof prescription pads, set to go into effect on Oct. 1. The associations have claimed that there is insufficient time for physicians to be notified of the new requirement and obtain these prescription pads. If a prescription is not written on tamper-resistant paper, the new law puts the pharmacist in the position of potentially having to deny prescriptions to Medicaid patients.

“Now is crunch time for the American pharmacy and the patients they serve,” said Steve Anderson, NACDS president and chief executive officer. “These policies are not a result of a pharmacist’s work but rather a lack of understanding of their work. With the aid of our active members, we are hopeful that we can maintain momentum for H.R. 3140 and S.1951, mitigate the negative impacts on pharmacies, and continue providing the access to healthcare services and prescription drugs that patients expect and trust.”

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

PHARMACY

New York joins state lawsuits over Vioxx

BY Drew Buono

NEW YORK New York has become the seventh state to file a lawsuit against Merck over its controversial painkiller Vioxx, according to a Financial Times article on MSNBC.com.

The state is alleging that the company misrepresented dangers associated with the drug and are therefore looking to recover public funds spent on prescriptions. The lawsuit is the first to be filed under the new state law, which allows damages to be rewarded of up to three times the sum spent by a state, which according to New York is more than $100 million.

“Even as evidence was piling up showing just how dangerous this drug was, Merck put profits above all else and put thousands at risk by continuing to push Vioxx inappropriately on doctors and patients,” said Attorney General Andrew Cuomo.

Recently, the New Jersey Supreme Court denied a lawsuit brought about by insurance and healthcare companies against Merck concerning Vioxx.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

PHARMACY

Rendell selects Rite Aid as site for CHIP information in Pa.

BY Michael Johnsen

HARRISBURG, Pa. Pennsylvania Gov. Edward Rendell on Tuesday chose Rite Aid to be the conduit for information on the state’s Children’s Health Insurance Program—Rite Aid stores throughout south central Pennsylvania will host registration booths Sept. 27 from 2 p.m. to 6 p.m.

“We’re working hard to make sure every parent understands that no family earns too much for their children to be covered by CHIP,” Rendell stated. “Through Cover All Kids, CHIP is now available to thousands of uninsured children whose parents who may have earned too much to qualify for coverage under the old guidelines.”

Under the new guidelines, some families qualify for free CHIP coverage while others may receive coverage at a low cost based on family income. CHIP enrollment increased to 164,485 in September, a growth of more than 11 percent since September 2006. More than 4,200 children who are now in CHIP would not have previously been eligible.

Participating Rite Aid Store locations include: 4299 Union Deposit Rd., Harrisburg; 2604 Linglestown Rd., Harrisburg; 3601 Walnut St., Harrisburg; 1137 Market St., Lemoyne; 5277 Simpson Ferry Rd., Mechanicsburg; 40-42 West Market St., York; 3615 East Market St., York (Springettsbury); 115 Leader Heights Rd., York; 4135 North George St. Extension, York (Manchester); 1200 West Market St., York; 59 North Queen St., Lancaster; 1130 Cumberland St., Lebanon.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES