PHARMACY

Community-based healthcare models can help diabetic patients

BY Antoinette Alexander

NEW YORK — Community-based healthcare models, and the nurse practitioners who work within them, are particularly helpful in assisting diabetes patients with such underlying health conditions as depression, according to a recent study published on Nurse.com.

The findings are from a study conducted by Kathleen Falk, nursing professor at New York City College of Technology. Falk, the chairwoman of the "Adult Day Health Council Research Collaborative Diabetes Management Study," observed 104 participants from 10 adult day healthcare centers in the state of New York.

"In a hospital, the nurses do everything for people living with diabetes," Falk was quoted as saying. "But when such clients go home, they can become overwhelmed with the complexity of their own care. Self-management involves needles, medications, insulin, blood sugar checks, dietary changes and many follow-up appointments. Many people can’t handle that, especially those who are depressed."

Falk noted, according to the report, that nurses working in the centers were particularly helpful in the study’s care model, and are judicious in identifying symptoms of depression, which is the first step in effective treatment.

Falk used data from A1C blood tests, blood pressure screenings and cholesterol screenings as a reference point, and led a team of other nurse case managers, dietitians, physical therapists, social workers and endocrinologists. The team established individual care plans for survey participants and provided podiatry, dental and eye exams, the report stated.

At least 60% of patients, including those with cognitive impairment or depression, showed a statistically significant decrease in A1C levels at each three-month assessment point, the report stated. About 25% worsened.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

e.saanser says:
Dec-17-2010 06:55 pm

Community based health care models give a more one on one care that can help the diabetic. These are helpful also in Europe.

TRENDING STORIES

PHARMACY

Retail pharmacy can rest easy with AMP victory

BY Jim Frederick

WHAT IT MEANS AND WHY IT’S IMPORTANT — It’s a battle that raged for more than three years. But in mid-December, the retail pharmacy industry was able to declare a clear, unequivocal victory.

(THE NEWS: In landmark victory for retail pharmacy, feds agree to drop last AMP provisions. For the full story, click here)

We’re talking, of course, about the struggle to head off what would have been a devastating change in the way Medicaid pays community pharmacies to dispense generic drugs to low-income patients. This week, the chain and independent pharmacy lobbies announced they had reached a landmark agreement with the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services that effectively ends the threat.

In short, the National Association of Chain Drug Stores and the National Community Pharmacists Association refer to the proposed changes as “AMP,” which stands for “average manufacturer price.” CMS had proposed AMP as a new method for calculating the market price of generics as a new basis for establishing the federal upper limit of reimbursements to pharmacies for dispensing those generics to Medicaid patients.

CMS unveiled the new reimbursement guidelines as a way to cut Medicaid costs in line with the Deficit Reduction Act of 2006. But pharmacy leaders have long argued that it’s a flawed approach to cost-saving by the government. AMP doesn’t reflect the true acquisition cost of the generic for retail pharmacies, they argued, since it takes into account the lower costs paid by other types of purchasing entities, such as hospitals and institutions. What’s more, the feds’ definition of “multiple-source drug” itself was flawed, pharmacy advocates asserted.

Together with the low rate of markups CMS was proposing for generic Medicaid payments, the new AMP rule drastically would have cut pharmacy reimbursements and made it all but impossible to dispense medicines to low-income patients without incurring a loss, pharmacy leaders have long argued. To head off the change, NACDS and NCPA filed suit in federal district court in 2007 to halt the new AMP guidelines from taking effect.

The resulting court-imposed injunction has kept AMP from taking effect, and it has saved chain and independent pharmacies an estimated total of $5.5 million a day ever since. Now that CMS finally agreed to withdraw its reimbursement plan and go back to the drawing board, NACDS and NCPA, along with their members, are breathing a sigh of relief. The fact that they’ve also agreed to drop the suit signals the end of a long — and ultimately victorious — battle for respect, and a decent return on their business.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

PHARMACY

FDA approves Safyral

BY Allison Cerra

WAYNE, N.J. — The Food and Drug Administration has approved a new oral contraceptive developed by Bayer.

Safyral is a combination of Yasmin, also developed by Bayer, with 451 mcg levomefolate calcium, which is a B vitamin known as a folate. It is the second oral contraceptive from Bayer that features folate.

"With the FDA approval of Safyral, Bayer now offers two oral contraceptives that contain folate," said Leslie North, VP women’s healthcare marketing at Bayer HealthCare Pharmaceuticals. "Safyral and Beyaz are part of Bayer’s growing women’s health franchise, and these new products reinforce our commitment to providing women various contraceptive options."

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

C.HARISS says:
Mar-21-2013 09:13 pm

It's great that the FDA has already approved of Safryal. This is a good move. - Marcus, Long Island eye doctor

TRENDING STORIES