PHARMACY

Combining Lilly and Amylin drug with insulin intake found to promote weight loss

BY Alaric DeArment

CHAPEL HILL, N.C. — Combining a diabetes drug marketed by Eli Lilly and Amylin Pharmaceuticals controls blood sugar and promotes weight loss more than insulin alone, according to a new study.

Researchers at sites in the United States, Mexico, the United Kingdom, Greece and Israel recruited 261 patients with Type 2 diabetes taking daily injections of Sanofi-Aventis’ insulin analog Lantus (insulin glargine [rDNA origin]) and randomly assigned them to receive placebo or twice-daily injections of Lilly and Amylin’s Byetta (exenatide). Among the 138 taking Byetta, 60% achieved almost normal blood sugar levels and lost an average of 4 lbs., compared with those in the placebo group, who gained 2 lbs. on average and of whom 35% lowered their blood sugar to the same degree.

“This study may be the best result ever for patients whose diabetes is inadequately controlled on a combination of pills and insulin,” University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School medical researcher and lead study author John Buse stated. “Until now, it was inconceivable that you could get such patients under excellent control with weight loss and no significant problems with hypoglycemia.”

The study appeared online in the journal Annals of Internal Medicine and will appear in the print edition on Jan. 18.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

PHARMACY

Decision Resources: J&J, Merck chemotherapy drugs will emerge as go-to second-line treatments

BY Alaric DeArment

BURLINGTON, Mass. — Chemotherapy drugs made by Johnson & Johnson and Merck will become the standard second-line treatment for ovarian cancer within the decade, replacing a treatment made by Bristol-Myers Squibb and generic versions, according to a new report by market research firm Decision Resources.

The report projected that by 2019, combinations of the chemotherapy drug carboplatin with J&J’s Doxil or Merck’s Caelyx, both formulations of doxorubicin hydrochloride, will replace Bristol’s Paraplatin (paclitaxel) combined with carboplatin in several developed countries; paclitaxel also is available in generic form.

“Experts we interviewed believe that such gains in addressing unmet need will most likely come from novel targeted agents,” Decision Resources analyst Niamh Murphy said. “As such, the need exists to identify other genetic characteristics … that will lead to the development of novel, molecularly targeted drugs [that] will benefit patients with ovarian cancer.”

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

PHARMACY

The Little Clinic’s accepted provider networks expand

BY Antoinette Alexander

BRENTWOOD, Tenn. — The Little Clinic, which operates clinics inside select Kroger, King Soopers, Fry’s Food Stores and Publix Super Markets, has announced the addition of the MultiPlan and PHCS Networks to its group of accepted provider networks.

"We are pleased to expand our roster of accepted networks and serve more consumers in the communities surrounding our clinics," stated Mike Stoll, CEO for The Little Clinic. "This announcement represents another step forward in our commitment to bring convenient, accessible and affordable health care to more patients than ever before."

Founded in 2003 and headquartered in Brentwood, Tenn., The Little Clinic has clinics inside select Kroger stores in Kentucky, Tennessee and Ohio; King Soopers stores in Colorado; Fry’s Food Stores in Arizona; and Publix Super Markets in Georgia and Florida. The Little Clinic earned The Joint Commission Gold Seal of Approval in March 2009.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES