HEALTH

Clinical trial confirms PharmaSmart blood pressure comparable to gold standard ambulatory measurement

BY Michael Johnsen

ROCHESTER, N.Y. — A peer-reviewed clinical study recently published Nov. 19, 2014 in the Journal of the American Society of Hypertension has concluded that routine blood pressure testing on PharmaSmart kiosks “closely approximates” daytime ambulatory blood pressure measurement. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring is considered the clinical gold standard for the diagnosis and management of hypertension. According to the study authors, the findings “support the use” of PharmaSmart in the assessment of hypertension.
 
The study, using self-measured blood pressure on PharmaSmart kiosks located in “real world” community pharmacy settings, also concluded that routine PharmaSmart measurement yields results similar to validated, averaged, “automated office” blood pressure, widely considered the most robust “in-office” method of assessing blood pressure.
 
Michael Rakotz, director of population and virtual medicine at Northwestern Medical Group in Evanston added, “We know that self-measurement of blood pressure is important, and can help patients reach and maintain their target blood pressures. We also know that pharmacists play an important role in helping patients understand their blood pressure and the medication they take to treat it. This new evidence using PharmaSmart kiosks is an important new development for patient self-measurement occurring in the communities where people live and work. One that clinicians can now better rely on for accuracy, in a location that is positioned to support the role of pharmacists contributing more significantly in blood pressure comanagement.”
 
Yvonne Gallagher, EVP, Sav-Mor Rx stated, “Because PharmaSmart’s program is founded on clinical evidence, we can now offer local health plans a member-based, life-saving health management tool. PharmaSmart Health Screening kiosks deliver ‘source-valid’ data that support cardiovascular risk reduction. At Sav-Mor Rx/Sav-On, controlling hypertension and improving patient health outcomes is our No. 1 priority. This latest clinical research further strengthens our value proposition with payers, physicians and patients, and sends a strong message to our pharmacists that they have the tools in place to practice to the full scope of their training while generating payer incentives.”
 
Bruce Alpert, professor of pediatrics, Division of Cardiology, University of Tennessee Health Science Center (retired), and editorial board member of the American Journal of Cardiology stated, “It is very important that we develop new ways to track blood pressure outside the office that are valid, affordable and accessible to patients. We know that blood pressure kiosks are used at least 1 million times per day in the U.S., but most kiosk devices do not meet basic accuracy criteria. This new evidence places pharmacies using PharmaSmart kiosks on a strong clinical footing, and will improve the ability of those pharmacies to collaborate with physicians in the management of their patients’ blood pressure.”

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon’s entry would shake up the most?
HEALTH

Majority of Americans want connected devices to help monitor health

BY Michael Johnsen

SAN JOSE, Calif. — According to an A&D Medical survey released Tuesday, more than half (56%) of Americans want to monitor their health with connnected devices. Most Americans are concerned about their weight, while less than half are concerned with their blood pressure. And very few Americans want to monitor their sexual activity or fertility, the survey found.
 
”While The Internet of Things is delivering a vast array of capabilities that come from connectivity, few come close to the human health benefits that come from professional and accurate monitoring of people’s vital health signs,” said Terry Duesterhoeft, president and CEO A&D Medical. “This survey shows that people really care about core health indicators like weight and blood pressure, and many want their doctors to be able to monitor them on a regular basis, with medical grade connected capabilities they can trust with their well-being. A&D Medical is helping millions of Americans with solutions that help improve fitness, lose weight, monitor blood pressure — all while securely sharing and reporting the information to the people you choose.”
 
A majority of Americans (66%) are concerned about their weight, with men between the ages of 55 years and 64 years the most concerned demographic with 74% concerned, followed by women ages 18 years to 34 years with 73% concerned. When it comes to weight, American concerns included the following:
 
  • Being overweight: 48%;
  • Being at risk for diabetes: 26%;
  • Considered attractive: 19%;
  • Sleep apnea: 11%;
  • Cancer:7%; and
  • Being underweight: 4%. 
Nearly half of Americans (48%) are concerned about their blood pressure, with 1-in-4 Americans (25%) concerned about either having a stroke or developing hypertension. More than 1-in-5 Americans (23%) are worried about heart attacks.
 
A majority of Americans (56%) would want to monitor their health with connected health devices that automatically connect online and send information to their doctor or other people they choose. The most popular vital sign Americans wanted monitored was blood pressure, with 37% of Americans wanting to monitor that with connected devices followed by:
 
  • Weight:33%;
  • Chronic conditions (hypertension, diabetes, etc.): 25%;
  • Sleep: 23%;
  • Physical activity: 22%;
  • Diet: 19%;
  • Vision: 18%;
  • Medicine: 16%;
  • Sexual activity: 5%; and
  • Fertility: 4%. 
One-in-two Americans say they want at home health measurement devices to automatically connect online to send information to their doctor and other people they choose. Americans cited several reasons they would want connected health, including:
 
  • It would keep track of my health information accurately: 30%;
  • It would allow me and my doctor to see trends and patterns: 29%;
  • It would give me peace of mind to know how I’m doing: 24%;
  • It would allow my doctor to be “in the know” to prevent surprises during appointments: 19%;
  • It would allow my doctor to monitor my health 24/7 if necessary: 18%;
  • Internet of Things is the future of medicin: 11%;
  • The whole world is connected so it makes sense for devices to be connected:10%; and
  • It’s difficult to enter the information into an app: 3%. 
A majority of Americans (53%) say they would want connected health devices or apps to come from a company with healthcare experience for the following reasons: medical expertise is important to me (26%); I want to know I can trust the company making the device or app (25%); and companies with medical experience will know what information will be trusted by my doctors or important to my doctors (18%).
 
A&D Medical's Connected Health Study was conducted by Harris Poll, which surveyed 2,024 American adults representative of the United States in December 2014. A&D Medical commissioned the research to bring attention to WellnessConnected, a complete, connected health system with built-in sharing capabilities that offers both simplicity and affordability for consumers, as well as the security and precision demanded by healthcare providers.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon’s entry would shake up the most?
HEALTH

Study: Smoking cessation could benefit chronic wound patients

BY Michael Johnsen

COLUMBUS, Ohio — While smokers are likely to hear dozens of reasons why they should quit, a new study is showing that there is a major health issue that healthcare providers may not be discussing: chronic wounds.
 
Affecting 6.5 million people in the United States, non-healing wounds such as pressure ulcers, venous leg ulcers and diabetic foot ulcers cost the healthcare system more than $25 billion dollars a year.
 
Yet according to a recently published study from Jodi McDaniel and Kristine Browning, researchers from The Ohio State University College of Nursing, the correlation between smoking and wound problems are rarely discussed during the often frequent doctor visits that chronic wound patients have.
 
“Despite the evidence that cigarette smoking negatively impacts wound healing on multiple levels, it’s just not something that is typically mentioned in a patient visit,” McDaniel said. “While evidence based guidelines for both chronic wound care and smoking cessation exist, they aren’t being implemented together. We think this could be having profound effects on clinical outcomes, and ultimately, patient’s quality of life.”
 
While chronic wounds vary in type, they share common characteristics of inflammation and reduced blood flow that make them particularly susceptible to the approximately 4,000 toxic chemicals found in cigarette smoke.
 
“The deep skin wrinkling associated with chronic smoking is caused by chemicals that impact the production of collagen, a protein that is also critical to the wound repair process,” McDaniel said. “Chemicals like carbon monoxide also reduce blood flow to the wound and prevent skin’s natural anti-inflammatory and anti-bacterial mechanisms – so it’s a perfect chemical storm which makes wounds more likely to get infected, and less likely to heal.”
 
One of the study authors, McDaniel — who received pilot funding from The Ohio State University Center for Clinical and Translational Science to conduct the research — says that it takes just one cigarette to reduce blood and oxygen flow to tissues, and that a pack a day habit results in significant and prolonged oxygen deprivation to tissues.
 
The nurse scientists point out that these data alone, coupled with the vast financial, social and clinical impact of chronic wounds, should make smoking cessation a priority topic during clinical visits.
 
“There are people with non-healing wounds living with chronic pain or needing amputations,” Browning said. “It’s stunning that more attention hasn’t been paid to this issue.”
 
While nicotine is one of the chemicals in cigarettes that has been connected with reduced blood flow, McDaniel noted that studies looking at the use of nicotine replacement drugs, used by millions to help kick the habit, don’t appear to have the same impact on tissue as when the chemical is inhaled through smoke.
 
“It’s possible that nicotine’s vasoconstrictive properties are amplified when it’s paired with substances in cigarette smoke like carbon monoxide and cyanide,” said McDaniel. “So we still think that nicotine replacement drug therapy has a vital role in cessation treatment.”
 
The study was also funded by a grant from the National Institute of Nursing Research.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon’s entry would shake up the most?