BEAUTY CARE

Cleansers, moisturizers take the lead

BY Antoinette Alexander

Anti-aging products, once the darling of the facial skin care category, have experienced a slowdown in growth since the recession — due, in part, to an influx of new products and likely some cannibalization from such multitasking products as BB creams. Meanwhile, skin care staples like facial moisturizers and cleansers have moved into the lead. And while the overall facial skin care category is projected to see little growth in 2013, industry sources suggest that a turnaround is on the horizon.

(For the full category review, including sales data, click here.)

“The facial skin care category has seen modest growth over the past several years, though shifts in segment performance suggest underlying changes in both consumer behaviors and product innovations,” stated research firm Mintel in its May 2013 report on U.S. facial skin care.

Anti-aging — which is the largest segment within facial skin care, holding nearly 40% of market share — experienced a 2.2% decline between 2010 and 2012. Mintel suggested that an influx of new product launches over the past five years and the rise in color cosmetics making anti-aging claims contributed to the decline.

There’s no doubt that the anti-aging segment has experienced a flood of new product launches in recent years, especially as beauty giants snap up professional brands to add to their portfolios. For example, L’Oréal has acquired Pacific Bioscience Labs, the maker of the Clarisonic line of skin care devices, and at press time, it was announced that L’Oréal had purchased Mumbai-based Cheryl’s Cosmeceuticals to broaden its professional products division.

Facial cleansers and moisturizers, on the other hand, enjoyed a bit of a rebound as both segments saw a roughly 10% boost in sales between 2010 and 2012, according to Mintel.

Meanwhile, acne treatments saw minimal gains of 1.5% during that time, and fade/bleach, which is the smallest segment within the category, experienced a 6% drop in sales between 2010 and 2012.

Facial cleansers and facial moisturizers, which collectively account for 41% of the category sales, are likely benefiting not only from improving economic conditions and growth in new segments like men’s facial skin care, but also from consumers’ most cited reason for using facial skin care — cleansing and treating dry skin.

Looking ahead, Mintel predicted that the facial skin care category will enjoy a turnaround beginning in 2014, with sales forecast to reach more than $7 billion by 2017.

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BEAUTY CARE

Coppertone tackles ink with Tattoo Guard to prevent fading, blurring

BY Antoinette Alexander

MEMPHIS, Tenn. — Well-known sun care brand Coppertone has tackled a sun care need not often talked about — tattoos. For 2013, the brand launched its Tattoo Guard products to help protect against UVA and UVB rays that can fade or blur tattoos. Available as a lotion with SPF 50 or stick with SPF 50+, the formulas offer broad-spectrum protection and can help maintain the smooth appearance of tattooed skin. The lotion is ideal for larger tattooed areas, while the stick is great for precise, spot application.

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Skin care benefits brighten sales

BY Antoinette Alexander

Category saturation and competition from private label may be inhibiting sales growth within the sun care segment, but infusing additional skin care benefits, like antioxidants, and targeting such demographic groups as men and multicultural consumers could help brighten sales.

(For the full category review, including sales data, click here.)

According to research firm Mintel, the U.S. sun protection and sunless tanner market has benefited from skin cancer awareness campaigns, as well as the overall education about the imp

ortance of sun protection, but category growth has plateaued in recent years thanks to market saturation and private-label increases. Mintel expects the market to experience only modest grow through 2017.

The reality is that sunscreen is still seen as a mostly seasonal product that is necessary only when spending a lot of time outdoors or while on vacation.

Those products that are more likely to be used daily, particularly among women, are skin care products and makeup with SPF. Further illustrating that point, The NPD Group reported that sales of makeup and skin care with SPF reached $1.1 billion in U.S. prestige department stores from June 2012 to May 2013 — a 24% boost from three years ago.

Adding skin care benefits like antioxidants and anti-aging ingredients into more sun protection products could help generate greater usage, Mintel suggested.

“As the lines between skin care and sun care continue to blur, it stands to reason that more sun care brands will offer skin care benefits in their products,” Mintel stated in its November 2012 U.S. “Sun Protection and Sunless Tanners” report.

Targeting men also represents an opportunity for marketers as usage rates vary by gender. Mintel stated that 49% of females report use of sun care products compared with just 29% of men.

It also is important to note that ethnic consumers represent a significant opportunity. Research has illustrated that there is a fairly common misconception among African-Americans and Hispanics that, because of their darker skin tone, they do not get skin cancer. However, that is far from the truth.

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