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Chrissy Teigen, Curtis Granderson to help consumers stay hydrated

BY Ryan Chavis

PURCHASE, N.Y. — Aquafina, a product from Pepsi-Cola North American Beverages, is launching a campaign encouraging people to drink more water. The brand has enlisted the help of New York Mets player Curtis Granderson and Sports Illustrated cover model Chrissy Teigen, in conjunction with Partnership for a Healthier America’s Drink Up initiative, to help out with the initiative.

Aquafina’s national "Pledge. Drink. Win!" Sweepstakes not only gives fans the chance to submit their personal hydration pledges, but also will automatically enter them for a chance to win a VIP experience to the 2014 MLB All-Star Game on July 15 at Target Field in Minneapolis.

"At Aquafina, we’re always trying to think of new ways to encourage people to drink more water," shared Jennifer Dubin of marketing for Aquafina. "This new effort will help shine a spotlight on the benefits and importance of staying hydrated with water during the spring and summer months, especially as we get into the height of baseball season. We’re honored to support PHA’s larger "Drink Up" movement and help spread the word about the importance of adequate water intake through the Aquafina ‘Pledge. Drink. Win!’ campaign."

Teigen and Granderson will launch the campaign at the MLB Fan Cave in New York City. Consumers can visit the "Pledge. Drink. Win!" page at MLB.com/Aquafina to learn more about the sweepstakes and take the pledge. The brand is inviting fans to take to Twitter to stir up the conversation using the hashtag #SpreadTheWater.

 

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Study: Low rate of cholesterol screening in children and adolescents

BY Michael Johnsen

CHICAGO — Although some guidelines recommend lipid screening for children and adolescents of certain ages, data indicate that only about 3% are having their cholesterol tested during health visits, according to a study in the May 7 issue of JAMA, a themed issue on child health. 

Abnormal lipid values occur in 1-in-5 U.S. children and adolescents, and are associated with cardiovascular disease in adulthood. Universal pediatric lipid screening is advised by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute for those ages 9 years to 11 years and 17 years to 21 years, in addition to the selective screening advised by the American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Heart Association. 

During the period from 1995 through 2010, clinicians ordered cholesterol testing at 3.4% of 10,159 health maintenance visits. Testing rates increased only slightly from 2.5% in 1995 to 3.2% in 2010. The authors noted that applying the most recent 2011 NHLBI guidelines to 2009 U.S. census data, approximately 35% of patients would be eligible for lipid screening in any given year based on age (9 years to 11 years and 17 years to 21 years).

 

 

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Study: Patients not more likely to get vaccinated during disease outbreak

BY Michael Johnsen

VANCOUVER, British Columbia — Conventional wisdom holds that when the risk of catching a disease is high, people are more likely to get vaccinated to protect themselves. This may not be the case, however, according to a study presented May 5 at the Pediatric Academic Societies’ annual meeting.

Researchers, led by Elizabeth Wolf, compared rates of infant vaccination with the diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis vaccine before and during an epidemic of pertussis (whooping cough) in Washington state. Surprisingly, they found no difference in vaccination rates.

"We have always assumed that when the risk of catching a disease is high, people will accept a vaccine that is effective in preventing that disease. Our results may challenge this assumption," stated Wolf, the Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award Fellow in General Academic Pediatrics at University of Washington, Seattle Children’s Research Institute.

Washington state experienced a pertussis epidemic from Oct. 1, 2011, through Dec. 31, 2012, and infants were hit the hardest. The highly contagious bacterial disease causes uncontrollable, violent coughing that can make it hard to breathe. Pertussis also is known as whooping cough because a "whooping" sound often is heard when the patient tries to take a breath. Pertussis can lead to pneumonia, seizures (jerking and staring spells), brain damage and death.

Wolf and her colleagues compared the proportion of 3- to 8-month-olds who had received the recommended number of doses of pertussis-containing vaccine before the epidemic and during the epidemic. Infants who received at least one dose by 3 months of age, at least two doses by 5 months and at least three doses by 7 months are considered up to date by the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

"We hypothesized that a whooping cough epidemic would result in more parents getting their children immunized against whooping cough," Wolf said. "But compared to a time before the 2011-2012 whooping cough epidemic in Washington state, there was no significant increase in receipt of whooping cough vaccines for infants during the epidemic."

Results did show considerable variability in vaccination rates among different counties.

"Vaccination rates in the U.S. are still below public health goals," Wolf noted. "We don’t fully understand what improves vaccine acceptance. This study found no significant increase in vaccination coverage statewide during the 2011-2012 pertussis epidemic. This finding may challenge the assumption that vaccine acceptance uniformly increases when risk of disease is high."

 

 

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