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CHPA’s Stop Medicine Abuse campaign named honoree for the 17th Annual Webby Awards

BY Michael Johnsen

WASHINGTON — The Consumer Healthcare Products Association’s Stop Medicine Abuse campaign was selected as an official honoree in the 17th Annual Webby Awards in the Family/Parenting category, the over-the-counter association announced Thursday. 

“We are very excited to receive this recognition, as our call to action has always been reaching parents about a problem that often flies under the radar screen and mobilizing them to safeguard their medicines cabinets and talk to their teens,” stated Emily Skor, CHPA VP communications and alliance development. “It’s encouraging to be named among many well-known groups as we continue to seek innovative ways to give parents the tools and information they need to prevent cough medicine abuse and keep their teens safe.”

Launched in 2009, StopMedicineAbuse.org was redesigned last year to provide parents and community leaders with new tools and information to engage them in the fight against teen abuse of OTC cough medicine containing dextromethorphan. One in 20 teens reports abusing OTC cough medicine to get high, CHPA noted. The Stop Medicine Abuse campaign has an active presence on Facebook, Twitter and YouTube, providing parents with prevention tips and generating parent-to-parent conversations led by five moms from across the United States with different backgrounds who make up the Stop Medicine Abuse Five Moms team.

The Webby Awards is the leading international award honoring excellence on the Internet. The Webbys is presented by the International Academy of Digital Arts and Sciences, a 1,000+ member judging body that includes executive members comprised of leading web experts, business figures, luminaries, visionaries and creative celebrities.

 

 

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Abbott Diabetes Care recalls FreeStyle lnsulinx Blood Glucose Meters

BY Michael Johnsen

ALAMEDA, Calif. — Abbott Diabetes Care earlier this week initiated a voluntary recall of its FreeStyle lnsulinx Blood Glucose Meters in the United States.

"Our first priority is to safeguard the health and safety of patients," stated Heather Mason, SVP Diabetes Care, Abbott. "We are committed to ensuring that our customers are able to continue to test their blood glucose with confidence, and we initiated this voluntary recall to ensure our products continue to meet the highest standards of quality and safety."

The company has determined that at extremely high blood glucose levels of 1024 mg/dL and above, the FreeStyle lnsulinx Meter will display and store in memory an incorrect test result that is 1024 mg/dL below the measured result. For example, at a blood glucose value of 1066 mg/dL, the meter will display and store a value of 42 mg/dL. 

No other Abbott blood glucose meters are impacted by this issue.

Blood glucose levels at 1024 mg/dL and above are very rare. However, if high blood glucose levels of 1024 mg/dL and above do occur, they are a serious health risk and require immediate medical attention. As the FreeStyle lnsulinx Meter can display an inaccurate low result at a blood glucose level above 1024 mg/dL, there may be a delay in the identification and treatment of severe hyperglycemia, or incorrect treatment may be given, the company noted. 

The company is notifying all registered users, healthcare professionals, pharmacies and distributors where the FreeStyle lnsulinx Meter is sold. Abbott estimates that there are approximately 50,000 active FreeStyle lnsulinx Meter users in the United States. 


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Physician-authored article sees ‘freeing’ nurses as one answer to healthcare crisis

BY Antoinette Alexander

NEW YORK — “It’s time to unlock the gates to the primary care club” and allow nurse practitioners to practice to the full extent of their education and training. That was a key message of a physician-authored article that recently ran in Slate magazine.
 
“Nurse practitioners should be released from their arbitrary bondage and do what they are trained to do, what they’re board-certified to do, and what many do so well: take care of patients and collaborate with physicians because they want to, not because they have to. Nurse practitioners and doctors should welcome each other’s perspectives, experiences, and abilities,” wrote Anne Reisman in the article titled “Free the Nurses.” Reisman is a physician in Connecticut.

In the article, posted April 18, Reisman outlines why she believes the “time is ripe” for change. Not only is student interest in primary care on the down slope, but the strain on the U.S. healthcare system will be further exasperated when some 30 million Americans gain coverage through the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act.

She also highlights research that shows "nurse practitioners provide as good care with as good outcomes as primary care physicians, along with high rates of patient satisfaction."

Given that Reisman is a physician, she also brings an interesting insight to the table — primary care is an “ever-evolving conglomeration of medical knowledge and systems and empathy and integrity and creativity in problem-solving, this is precisely why it’s good to mix it up and reap the benefits of some nurse practitioner-doctor hybrid vigor.”

To read the entire article click here.
 

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