HEALTH

CHPA shares success combating cough medicine abuse

BY Michael Johnsen

WASHINGTON — The Consumer Healthcare Products Association on Tuesday posted a video outlining the association's efforts in combating abuse of cough/cold medicines.

And CHPA is having a measurable impact. According to the results of the 2016 National Institute on Drug Abuse and University of Michigan’s Monitoring the Future survey released last month, the percentage of teens using over-the-counter cough medicine containing dextromethorphan to get high remains at 3%. When first reported by Monitoring the Future in 2006, teen OTC cough medicine abuse was at just under 6%.

"CHPA and our industry first became aware of abuse of dextromethorphan, a common cough medicine ingredient, back in 2006," opens Scott Melville, president and CEO CHPA. "We decided we needed to act."

Since, CHPA has developed a three-prong strategy in combating the issue, which includes connecting to parents and teens on awareness efforts and galvanizing the industry to restrict the sale of products containing DXM to adults over the age of 18.  

In 2009, CHPA member companies placed a “PARENTS: Learn About Teen Medicine Abuse” icon on the packaging of DXM-containing cough medicines.  The icon serves as a mini public service announcement for parents, making them aware of cough medicine abuse at the point-of-sale and point-of-use and directing them to StopMedicineAbuse.org.

Additionally, CHPA collaborates with The Partnership for Drug-Free Kids to target teens likely to abuse DXM based on their online search activity and provide them accurate information about the consequences of this behavior. Teens are directed to visit WhatIsDXM.com to learn more.

To help restrict teen access to DXM, CHPA supported the passage of state laws prohibiting the sale of medicines containing DXM to those under 18.  Currently 12 states, Alaska, Arizona, California, Delaware, Florida, Kentucky, Louisiana, New Jersey, New York, Tennessee, Virginia, and Washington, have all passed this legislation, three of which passed last year thanks to CHPA’s active engagement.
 

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Flu incidence on the rise and this season could be severe, CDC says

BY Michael Johnsen

ATLANTA  — Incidence of influenza is elevated in all but one of 10 HHS Surveillance Regions for the week ended Dec. 31, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently reported. The end of the year marked the third week influenza activity was above the national baseline level of 2.2% as activity levels continue to climb.

There were several pockets of high influenza activity, including throughout New York City, Puerto Rico and 10 states  (Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana, Missouri, New Jersey, New York, Oklahoma, Oregon, South Carolina and Utah).

Influenza A (H3N2) viruses have been identified most frequently in the United States. Of respiratory samples from the United States that were analyzed by public health laboratories, 1,160 were positive for influenza, of which 1,050 (90.5%) were influenza A and 110 (9.5%) were influenza B. Of the 972 influenza A viruses that were subtyped, most (96.3%) were H3 viruses and (3.7%) were (H1N1)pdm09 viruses.

In the past, H3N2-predominant seasons have been associated with more severe illness and higher mortality, especially in older people and young children, relative to H1N1- or B-predominant season. While it’s not possible to predict which influenza viruses will predominate for the entire 2016-2017 influenza season, if H3N2 viruses continue to circulate widely, older adults and young children may be more severely impacted.
  

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U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommends mothers take folic acid supplements

BY Michael Johnsen

WASHINGTON – The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force on Tuesday published a final recommendation statement on folic acid, suggesting all women who are planning or able to become pregnant take a daily supplement containing 400 micrograms  to 800 micrograms of folic acid.

“The Task Force found convincing evidence that the risk of neural tube defects can be reduced when women take a daily folic acid supplement,” stated Alex Kemper, Task Force member. “These supplements can be taken as a daily multivitamin, prenatal vitamin or single tablet that has the recommended amount of folic acid.”

Folic acid is found naturally in many fruits and vegetables, such as leafy greens, broccoli and orange juice. Additionally, in the United States, many foods such as flour, cereals and breads are fortified with folic acid. However, even with food fortification, most women do not get the recommended dose of folic acid per day through diet alone.

“We commend the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force for its continued recommendation that all women of child-bearing age supplement with folic acid to avoid experiencing [birth defects]," stated Duffy MacKay, SVP scientific and regulatory affairs for the Council for Responsible Nutrition. MacKay noted that the amount of folic acid being recommended is typically found in multivitamins and pre-natal vitamins.

"Government data have repeatedly validated that there is ‘considerable room for improvement in the use of folic acid supplements across the population of reproductive-age women,’ as stated in the accompanying editorial published in JAMA Pediatrics," MacKay noted. "Thus, we hope that this recommendation, which is supported by reputable institutions, such as the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, the American Academy of Family Physicians and the American Academy of Pediatrics, is taken under serious consideration and adhered to for the health and wellbeing of our nation’s future generations."

MacKay suggested that strong recommendations from government agencies advocating supplementation should pave the way to include multivitamins with folic acid within all government nutrition programs, including Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Programs. "This will ensure that reproductive-age women looking to the government for nutritional assistance will have access to the protective effects of folic acid during pregnancy," he said. "Low-income mothers should have the choice to use their SNAP benefits to purchase a multivitamin with folic acid. Furthermore, a multivitamin provides other nutrients, such as iodine, that are critical for a healthy pregnancy.”

The critical period when folic acid supplements provide the most protective benefits begins one month before becoming pregnant and continues through the first three months of pregnancy.

Neural tube defects, in which the brain or spinal cord does not develop properly in a baby, are birth defects that can lead to a range of disabilities or death. Neural tube defects can occur early in a pregnancy, even before a woman knows she is pregnant. Taking folic acid before and during pregnancy can help protect babies against neural tube defects, the agency stated.

The Task Force’s recommendation has been published online in JAMA, as well as on the Task Force website

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