HEALTH

CHPA names new VP

BY Michael Johnsen

WASHINGTON — The Consumer Healthcare Products Association on Thursday announced that Emily Skor has been selected to serve as VP communications and alliance development, effective Feb. 14.

Reporting to CHPA president and CEO Scott Melville, Skor will oversee and provide strategic direction for all association communications, media relations, public education, brand management, consumer and market research and strategic partnerships. She also will oversee the CHPA Educational Foundation and serve as a member of the association’s senior management team.

“Emily brings to CHPA an outstanding record of developing and implementing strategic communications campaigns that raise awareness, build support and educate consumers and other stakeholders,” Melville stated. “She’ll be a great addition to the CHPA management team and will ensure the association effectively highlights the role and value of over-the-counter medicines and dietary supplements in our nation’s healthcare system.”

Skor most recently served as SVP at Dezenhall Resources, a nationally recognized high-stakes communications firm, where for more than a decade she counseled Fortune 500 companies and industry associations in the healthcare sector, among others. Prior to her agency experience at Dezenhall Resources, Skor managed public affairs and public relations programs for government agencies, nonprofits and industry associations as a senior account executive at Cohn & Wolf.

Skor is an alumna of Wellesley College, where she received a B.A. with honors in political science.

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Andrew Shao named Herbalife’s VP global product science and safety

BY Michael Johnsen

LOS ANGELES — Direct-to-consumer distributor Herbalife on Wednesday named longtime Council for Responsible Nutrition executive Andrew Shao to the post of VP global product science and safety, effective March 7.

Shao will be responsible for assuring that all products sold by Herbalife are safe and meet regulatory safety requirements, and that all product claims are scientifically supportable, ensuring Herbalife’s leadership position in the industry. Shao will report to Bill Frankos, former FDA director, division of dietary supplements programs, Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition, who joined the company last April.

Before serving at CRN, Shao was a senior scientist at General Nutrition Corp. He is the author or co-author of more than 30 peer-reviewed articles and abstracts, and is a member of the American Society for Nutrition, the American Society for Quality, the Institute of Food Technologists and the National Strength and Conditioning Association. He is the 2010 recipient of the Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy Alumni Association Award in the Leadership Category for his work within the field of nutrition.

Shao holds a PhD in nutritional biochemistry and a master’s degree in human nutrition science from Tufts University, as well as a bachelor’s degree in biology from Brandeis University.

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New aspirin formulation may be easier on stomach, GI tract

BY Michael Johnsen

HOUSTON — A recent clinical trial involving a new drug formulation incorporating aspirin with soy-derived phosphatidylcholine found that the drug combination significantly can reduce irritation to the stomach and upper gastrointestinal tract.

Healthy volunteers with an age-associated risk of ulceration who took the combination had 70% fewer gastrointestinal ulcers than those receiving regular aspirin. PL2200 previously has demonstrated equivalent antiplatelet activity, which suggested the product is the bioequivalent to regular aspirin in promoting heart health, study authors noted.

“One of the major issues with aspirin is that it causes ulceration to the stomach,” stated Byron Cryer, the study’s lead author and holder of the John C. Vanatta, III Professorship at The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas. “Despite all the potential approaches that have been looked at over the past decade, aspirin-induced ulceration remains an issue. Mechanistically, this formulation could give us a solution.”

Participants were between 50 and 74 years of age. Findings appear in a recent online publication of the American Journal of Gastroenterology.

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