HEALTH

CHPA, CRN call on FDA to drop NDI guidance

BY Michael Johnsen

WASHINGTON — The Consumer Healthcare Products Association and the Council for Responsible Nutrition on Friday jointly filed comments with the Food and Drug Administration seeking withdrawal of its New Dietary Ingredient Draft Guidance, and calling upon the agency to work with stakeholders on a revised version that will maintain the current scope and intent of the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act of 1994.

The submission noted that the agency’s proposed guidance would impose significant and unnecessary new burdens on the dietary supplement industry without conferring additional benefits to consumers. 

“We had hoped [the] FDA would propose a reasonable guidance related to new dietary ingredients, but this guidance goes far beyond what Congress authorized under the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act of 1994,” stated CHPA President and CEO Scott Melville. “Rather than developing standards and a process for new dietary ingredients in accordance with DSHEA, this guidance would impose significant new burdens that would impact consumer access to dietary supplements as well as reduce innovation and growth of this industry.”

“The draft guidance essentially would undo nearly two decades of agency practice and policy that began with DSHEA’s passage," added CRN president and CEO Steve Mister. "CRN and others in the industry have been calling on [the] FDA to provide clarity through this draft guidance, and responsible industry fully supports a reasonable guidance that provides directions for filing NDI notices within the legal framework of DSHEA. However, this guidance does not answer that call.”



The joint comments highlighted five areas of concern, including the draft guidance’s requirement of notifications for individual supplements by each manufacturer rather than for the ingredient — a process that, if realized, would result in duplicative and unnecessary notifications.


Interested in this topic? Sign up for our weekly Retail Health Provider e-newsletter. 


keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

HEALTH

ABC’s ‘Nightline’ shadows three meth busts

BY Michael Johnsen

NEW YORK — ABC’s "Nightline: Late Evening News" on Wednesday aired an exposé on Kentucky’s methamphetamine problem, shadowing law enforcement as they made three arrests in a state that employs an electronic tracking system for the over-the-counter ingredient pseudoephedrine. The officers investigated sales made at Walgreens, CVS and Walmart.

However, deputy director Dan Smoot — who leads a task force in London, Ky., called Operation UNITE — advocated legislation that would make PSE a controlled substance in an effort to reduce the number of meth lab busts. According to Smoot, 70% of PSE products sold through retail pharmacy are converted to meth.

The news program noted that meth lab busts are down significantly in the two states where PSE is prescription-only — Oregon and Mississippi. However, those states do not employ an electronic tracking tool to assist law enforcement in identifying potential meth labs.

According to the National Precursor Log Exchange, an interstate electronic tracking system of PSE sales, 52 million grams in PSE sales have been tracked to date, and 1.6 million grams in PSE sales have been blocked, suggesting a much lower diversion rate for PSE.

For the full video, click here.


Interested in this topic? Sign up for our weekly Retail Health Provider e-newsletter.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES