HEALTH

Children not getting enough vitamin D, study says

BY Alaric DeArment

NEW YORK A report published in the Archives of Pediatric and Adolescent medicine found that children are not getting enough vitamin D, which can lead to problems later in life.

The study looked at 380 children between the ages of 8 months and 2 years at Children’s Hospital Boston, finding vitamin D deficiency in 40 percent of subjects. The deficiency can cause weakness in the bones and immune system and results from insufficient intake of fortified milk or supplements, as well as being overweight.

The body manufactures vitamin D when sunlight hits the skin; it is also added to many foods. Foods naturally rich in vitamin D include salmon, sardines, cod, shrimp, milk and eggs, according to the George Mateljan Foundation for the World’s Healthiest Foods, with sockeye and Chinook salmon having the highest concentrations.

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Sarnoff wins GMDC achievment award

BY Alaric DeArment

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. Norton Sarnoff, president of Handi-Foil, won the Global Market Development Center’s 2008 Lifetime Achievement Award at the General Merchandise Marketing Conference Sunday in Orlando, Fla.

Sarnoff has worked in business for more than 50 years, mostly in aluminum foil products. He sold EZ POR, a company he inherited from his father, in 1979 and founded Handi-Foil in 1984. Based in Wheeling, Ill., Handi-Foil today has 700 employees and 650,000 square feet of manufacturing and distribution space.

Sarnoff was a member of GMDC’s general merchandise advisory board from 1985 to 1992, serving as the organization’s president in 1991. He has attended every General Merchandise Marketing Conference for the last 38 years.

GMDC is a trade association of General Merchandise and Health Beauty Wellness retailers, wholesalers and suppliers.

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Pollen.com adds two new features to its site

BY Michael Johnsen

PLYMOUTH MEETING, Pa. Pollen.com, a division of Surveillance Data, Inc., on Monday announced the addition of two new features, Pollen History and Two-City Comparison, to its site for people who suffer from seasonal allergies.

Pollen.com has also added a shopping feature for those who wish to comparison-shop for allergy-relieving products.

Pollen History provides a 30-day allergy index history by zip code. The proprietary index assigns a weighted value to key factors such as the pollen count, weather and wind speed and direction. Visitors can use the chart to track whether allergy conditions are increasing or decreasing over time. In the near future, the site will introduce a 90-day look-back, which will be the most extensive pollen history available on the web.

The Two-City Comparison Chart allows Pollen.com visitors to compare the pollen intensity in their own area with that of another location for the next four days by plugging in the two zip codes. The chart that pops up displays bar graphs showing the pollen severity levels in the two locations for each day.

“When people with allergies travel on business, vacation or relocate, they want to know how the expected pollen levels in other areas compare with what they’re currently experiencing,” stated Glenn Connery, manager of the application development/web group for SDI. “Our Two-City Comparison helps people plan their medication use and their outdoor activities a little better. The comparison feature has also been used by parents whose children have allergies and are going away to college in a different city.”

Pollen.com will soon expand both Pollen History and Two-City Comparison to include breakdowns of specific pollen sources such as trees, plants and grasses.

And the new “Allergy Buyers Club” feature allows Pollen.com users to shop online for a wide range of allergy relief and healthy home products, including air purifiers, dehumidifiers, water filters, furnace filters, vacuum cleaners and hypoallergenic bedding.

“This is a user-driven service,” Connery said. “We’re fortunate to have such an interested and involved audience, and we try to respond to their suggestions by providing the features that they want. Their feedback really makes a difference in the usefulness of the site.”

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