HEALTH

CDC: Flu prevalence remains high

BY Michael Johnsen

ATLANTA — According to this week’s FluView report, overall flu activity continued to be high across the nation, with activity continuing to spread from state to state, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported Friday. Thirty-five states are now experiencing widespread activity, and 20 states are reporting high levels of influenza-like illness. 

For the week ended Jan. 4, the proportion of people seeing their healthcare provider for ILI decreased, but remains above the national baseline. "The apparent decrease this week is likely due to differences in care-seeking, testing and reporting practices over the holidays, rather than an actual decline in flu activity," the CDC noted.  

Twenty states experienced high ILI activity, the same number as in the previous week. Seven states and New York City experienced moderate ILI activity, while 11 states experienced low ILI activity, and 12 states experienced minimal ILI activity.  

To date, influenza A (H1N1) viruses have predominated. This is the same H1N1 virus that emerged in 2009 to cause a pandemic, CDC noted. H1N1 viruses have continued to circulate among people since that time, but this is the first season that the virus has circulated at high levels since the pandemic. 

The predominant flu strains in circulation are well matched to the Northern Hemisphere quadrivalent and trivalent vaccines for the 2013-2014 season.

The neuraminidase inhibitors Tamiflu (oseltamivir) and Relenza (zanamivir) are currently the only recommended influenza antiviral drugs. While the vast majority of the viruses that have been tested are sensitive to oseltamivir and zanamivir, three additional 2009 H1N1 viruses proved resistant to oseltamivir during the week ended Jan. 4. So far this season 13 (1.2%) 2009 H1N1 viruses have shown resistance to oseltamivir. No viruses have shown resistance to zanamivir.

As in recent past seasons, high levels of resistance to the adamantanes (Symmetrel (amantadine) and Flumadine (rimantadine)) continue to persist among 2009 H1N1 and influenza A (H3N2) viruses. Adamantanes are not effective against influenza B viruses. Adamantanes are not recommended for use against influenza this season, the CDC noted.

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Real Health Labs launches Prostate Complete Once Per Day

BY Michael Johnsen

SAN DIEGO — Real Health Labs recently launched Prostate Complete Once Per Day, a pharmaceutical-grade supplement combination, the company stated. 

In addition to zinc, selenium and vitamin E, Prostate Complete Once Per Day is formulated with a standardized saw palmetto extract, lycopene, a standardized curcumin extract, resveratrol and a pomegranate concentrate. 

"Our newest prostate product is an all-natural, comprehensive formulation that includes clinically studied amounts of all of the standardized extracts that have been shown to support overall prostate health," the company stated. "More and more doctors are recommending the use of saw palmetto extract, the powerful antioxidant lycopene, pumpkin seed extract and selenium for prostate health." 

A 30-day supply retails for a suggested $16.99. 

 

 

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CHPA announces its support for bill that would place age restrictions on DXM sale

BY Michael Johnsen

WASHINGTON — The Consumer Healthcare Products Association on Friday pledged its support behind the introduction of legislation by Rep. Paul Harris, R-Wash., that would prohibit pharmacies or retail distributors from selling over-the-counter cough medicines containing dextromethorphan to those younger than 18 years without a prescription. CHPA says the bill, H.B. 2163, is a step toward preventing teen abuse of the medicines containing DXM. 

“The manufacturers of over-the-counter medicines are grateful to Rep. Harris for his leadership on this issue,” stated Carlos Gutierrez, CHPA’s senior director and head of state government affairs. “The passage of similar legislation in California and New York indicate the growing support in our country for this measure, which gives parents a tool to prevent their teens from abusing cough medicine. While there is no one solution to this problem, restricting access is an important part of prevention along with encouraging parents to talk to their teens about the risks and to safeguard the medicines in their home.”

The 2013 Monitoring the Future survey found that 4% of teens abuse medicines containing DXM to get high. 

CHPA also supports a national age-18 sales restriction introduced in the U.S. Senate, the Preventing Abuse of Cough Treatments (PACT) Act of 2013 (S. 644). 

 

 

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