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CDC: Diabetes may be on the rise, but complications are on the decline

BY Michael Johnsen

ATLANTA — Rates of five major diabetes-related complications have declined substantially in the last 20 years among U.S. adults with diabetes, according to a study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, published in the current issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Rates of lower-limb amputation, end-stage kidney failure, heart attack, stroke and deaths due to high blood sugar (hyperglycemia) all declined. Cardiovascular complications and deaths from high blood sugar decreased by more than 60% each, while the rates of both strokes and lower extremity amputations — including upper and lower legs, ankles, feet and toes — declined by about half. Rates for end stage kidney failure fell by about 30%.

“These findings show that we have come a long way in preventing complications and improving quality of life for people with diabetes,” said Edward Gregg, a senior epidemiologist in CDC’s Division of Diabetes Translation and lead author of the study. “While the declines in complications are good news, they are still high and will stay with us unless we can make substantial progress in preventing Type 2 diabetes.”

Because the number of adults reporting diabetes during this time frame more than tripled — from 6.5 million to 20.7 million — these major diabetes complications continue to put a heavy burden on the U.S. healthcare system. Nearly 26 million Americans have diabetes, and an additional 79 million have prediabetes and are at risk of developing the disease. Diabetes and its complications account for $176 billion in total medical costs each year. 

CDC researchers used data from the National Health Interview Survey, National Hospital Discharge Survey, U.S. Renal Data System and Vital Statistics to examine trends in the occurrence of diabetes-related complications in the United States between 1990 and 2010.

Although all complications declined, the greatest declines in diabetes-related complications occurred for heart attack and stroke, particularly among people ages 75 years and older. The study authors attribute the declines in diabetes-related complications to increased availability of healthcare services, risk factor control and increases in awareness of the potential complications of diabetes.

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Target expands online subscription service, offers discount

BY Antoinette Alexander

MINNEAPOLIS — Target is expanding its online subscription service with a nearly tenfold increase in available items — from 200 to more than 1,500 — and adding a discount on all subscription orders.

According to Target’s Bullseye View, the retailer is offering a 5% discount on all subscriptions orders, on top of free shipping, and another 5% off when guests use their Target REDcard.
 
In addition, the new expanded program will now go beyond baby care to include even more everyday essentials, such as cleaning supplies, health and beauty items, pet treats, training pads and printer ink.

The service, which quietly launched in September 2013 with a focus on baby care products, now accounts for more than 15% of online sales for eligible items.

 

 

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Welch’s delivers new Farmer’s Pick

BY Ryan Chavis

CONCORD, Mass. — Welch’s on Thursday announced the introduction of Farmer’s Pick, a line of juices that brings a fresh-picked fruit taste to juice aisles, according to the company. The product contains unfiltered juice and no artificial ingredients, and brings body, aroma and flavor with every glass, the company said.

“We know from listening to consumers that they are looking for a variety of beverage options — including juices that taste just like the fruit they’re made from with no artificial ingredients or preservatives,” said Brad Irwin, CEO of Welch’s. “Farmer’s Pick connects what the consumer wants with what we can deliver.”

The line is available in Concord grape, mango and blackberry. The company uses cold kettle batching to preserve flavor and aroma. Welch’s Farmer’s Pick contains no artificial flavors, synthetic colors or ingredients. Consumers can find Farmer’s Pick in the juice aisle; the 46-oz. bottles come with a suggested retail price of $3.29.

 

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