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CDC: Adults with disabilities who don’t exercise 50% more likely to have a chronic disease

BY Michael Johnsen

ATLANTA — Working-age adults with disabilities who do not get any aerobic physical activity are 50% more likely than their active peers to have a chronic disease — such as cancer, diabetes, stroke or heart disease — according to a Vital Signs report released earlier this week by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Nearly half (47%) of adults with disabilities who are able to do aerobic physical activity do not get any. An additional 22% are not active enough. Yet only about 44% of adults with disabilities who saw a doctor in the past year got a recommendation for physical activity. Adults with disabilities were 82% more likely to be physically active if their doctor recommended it.

“Physical activity is the closest thing we have to a wonder drug,” stated CDC director Tom Frieden. “Unfortunately, many adults with disabilities don’t get regular physical activity. That can change if doctors and other health care providers take a more active role helping their patients with disabilities develop a physical fitness plan that’s right for them.”

Most adults with disabilities are able to participate in some aerobic physical activity which has benefits for everyone by reducing the risk of serious chronic diseases. Some of the benefits from regular aerobic physical activity include increased heart and lung function; better performance in daily living activities; greater independence; decreased chances of developing chronic diseases; and improved mental health.

Working age adults with disabilities are three times more likely to have heart disease, stroke, diabetes or cancer than adults without disabilities. Inactive adults with disabilities were 50% more likely to report at least one chronic disease than were active adults with disabilities. 

The Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans recommend that all adults, including those with disabilities, get at least 150 minutes (2.5 hours) of moderate-intensity aerobic physical activity each week. If meeting these guidelines is not possible, adults with disabilities should start physical activity slowly based on their abilities and fitness level.

CDC has set up a dedicated resource page for doctors and other health professionals with information to help them recommend physical activity to their adult patients with disabilities, CDC.gov/disabilities/PA.    

 

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Target donates $100K for tornado and flood relief in the South

BY Antoinette Alexander

MINNEAPOLIS — Target has donated $100,000 in monetary support and product to assist with storm and tornado relief efforts impacting many Southern states, the retailer has announced.  

The donation includes a $55,000 cash donation to the American Red Cross, $20,000 in gift cards to local non-profits to provide items they need to help the community recover. Target stated that it will also donate $25,000 to aid in recovery efforts at impacted schools.

“Communities where we have a presence don’t just represent a store to Target; it’s home to many of our team members and countless valued guests,” stated John Mulligan, interim president and CEO, Target. “Our team supports local recovery responses by volunteering and donating product and funds, in addition to making sure our stores closest to the disaster area are able to offer needed supplies. We are proud of the commitment to community our team members exhibit, and hope our support helps to provide relief and comfort during the recovery.”

On May 1, more than 50 team members across eight different Target stores in Arkansas volunteered in the affected communities. Their work included distributing food, medical supplies, clothing, and water; clearing debris from an area roughly the size of eight football fields; and going door to door to help residents with their various needs.
 

 

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Report: U.S. Green Building Council to recognize Walgreens for net-zero retail store

BY Michael Johnsen

CHICAGO — The Illinois chapter of the U.S. Green Building Council on May 15 will recognize Walgreens for its net-zero energy store in Evanston, Ill., with the Green Innovation Award, according to a report in the Daily Northwestern published Thursday. 

“I think the obvious reason we picked the net-zero Walgreens for the award is that it’s one of the first retail stores in the world to generate more energy than it uses, which is really exciting,” Brian Imus, executive director of the council’s Illinois chapter, told the Daily.

The 14,000-sq.-ft. space combines a variety of renewable energy technologies, including two wind turbines and 850 solar panels, to generate as much energy as possible. Eight geothermal wells burrowed deep into the ground help heat and cool the building, whose roof was oriented to maximize the amount of solar energy generated on site. The store also was the winner of the Sustainable Store of the Year category in DSN sister publication Chain Store Age’s 32nd annual Retail Store of the Year Competition. 

To view a slideshow of the Evanston location, click here. 

 

 

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