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Carma Labs launches Carmex Cold Sore Treatment

BY Michael Johnsen

 

FRANKLIN, Wis. — Carma Labs on Wednesday announced the launch of Carmex Cold Sore Treatment. According to the company, it is the only over-the-counter cold sore treatment that works on contact to block pain and itch with 10% Benzocaine, while also minimizing the appearance of a sore. The formulation features TriPLEX Formula, which combines three different optical brightener and filler technologies that each provide unique appearance-minimizing benefits.
 
The combination of the three technologies found in TriPLEX Formula advanced technology allows this new formulation to provide cold sore appearance-softening benefits. The technology helps fill in unevenness and helps correct the skin tone of the cold sore. The formula also contains a blend of silicone elastomers, commonly used in high-end skincare products, to give the product a smooth, silky feel. 
 
Carmex Cold Sore Treatment has a suggested retail price of $14.99 (for a 0.07 oz. tube). 
 
According to the National Institutes of Health, herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1), the virus that causes cold sores, infects more than half of the U.S. population by the time they reach their 20s. The two biggest physical complaints respondents described were pain, which likely reminds them that the cold sore is there, and the appearance of the sore itself, which can lead to the sufferer feeling isolated and self-conscious, Carma Labs noted.
 
 
 

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Study: Aspirin not only prevents pain and inflammation, it also helps end inflammation

BY Michael Johnsen

SAN DIEGO — Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine concluded that aspirin, in addition to preventing pain and inflammation, actually helps hasten the end of inflammation in a study published this week in the online early edition of PNAS.
 
Non-steroidal anti-inflammation drugs like aspirin, naproxen and ibuprofen all work by inhibiting or killing an enzyme called cyclooxygenase – a key catalyst in production of hormone-like lipid compounds called prostaglandins that are linked to a variety of ailments, from headaches and arthritis to menstrual cramps and wound sepsis.
 
But the San Diego School of Medicine researchers found that aspirin has a second effect: Not only does it kill cyclooxygenase, thus preventing production of the prostaglandins that cause inflammation and pain, it also prompts the enzyme to generate another compound that hastens the end of inflammation, returning the affected cells to homeostatic health.
 
“Aspirin causes the cyclooxygenase to make a small amount of a related product called 15-HETE,” stated senior author Edward Dennis, distinguished professor of Pharmacology, Chemistry and Biochemistry. “During infection and inflammation, the 15-HETE can be converted by a second enzyme into lipoxin, which is known to help reverse inflammation and cause its resolution – a good thing.”
 
Specifically, Dennis and colleagues looked at the function of a type of white blood cells called macrophages, a major player in the body’s immune response to injury and infection. They found that macrophages contain the biochemical tools to not just initiate inflammation, a natural part of the immune response, but also to promote recovery from inflammation by releasing 15-HETE and converting it into lipoxin as the inflammation progresses.
 
Dennis said the findings may open new possibilities for anti-inflammatory therapies by developing new drugs based on analogues of lipoxin and other related molecules that promote resolution of inflammation. “If we can find ways to promote more resolution of inflammation, we can promote health,” he said.

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Report: Plans for Giant Eagle’s Columbus, Ohio, Market District Express moving forward

BY Michael Johnsen

BEXLEY, Ohio — Giant Eagle is planning to open a Market District Express store in Columbus, Ohio, according to a report in The Columbus Dispatch published Tuesday. 
 
According to the report, the city's Planning Commission is reviewing plans for a two-story, 30,000-square-foot store. The location is expected to field a sushi bar, a pharmacy and a selection of wine and craft beer. 
 
In December, Giant Eagle opened its first Market District Express location near Pittsburgh. Giant Eagle has also targeted the Cleveland area for Market District Express expansion. 
 

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